Neglected Chores: A Garden Update

Last weekend was not much for gardening. I went away on Saturday and Sunday was far too hot to be outside doing anything other than swimming or sitting in the shade reading. I did get to the garden on Monday and found some things in very good shape and others in need of attention.

The border flowers still look good.

The border flowers still look good, especially with the squash plants creeping into the picture.

There were zucchini and summer squash galore, which I’ll deliver to AFAC soon.

This little squash is trying to hide under some oak leaf lettuce.

This little squash is trying to hide under some oak leaf lettuce.

The watermelon and the cucumber plants seem to have a nice synergy going, though no fruits as yet. In my own garden, I have had several cucumbers already and am looking forward to more, but the outside Plot Against Hunger garden is so far watermelon and cucumber free.

At least there is some harmony in the world, if only among the vegetation.

At least there is some harmony in the world, if only among the vegetation.

In the small garden, there were passion flowers attempting a takeover. There were also some wildly overgrown tomatoes that I had not staked before. I staked. I weeded. I looked at the rabbit-nibbled pepper plants, which were recovering. I hoped for the best.Β In my garden, the sweet peas have executed their yearly coup, smothering all other vegetation along the fence.

I've been pleased at the growth of the black-eyed susans.

I’ve been pleased at the growth of the black-eyed susans.

The kale have had an invasion of harlequin bugs and look very sad. The okra are loving the hot wet weather.

I just love the look of these.  Can't wait for their blossoms.

I just love the look of these. Can’t wait for their blossoms.

Beans are coming on and basil is flourishing, but with a ‘nitrogen has been leached from my roots by torrential rain’ look to the leaves. Nonetheless, I’m enjoying their lovely flavor.

Notice the slightly burned look some of the leaves have.  Still delicious, though.

Notice the slightly burned look some of the leaves have. Still delicious, though.

And the surprise, back out in the Plot Against Hunger garden, was an acorn squash. Now that I’m not ready for, in spite of the heat. I’m beginning to get a feeling that this will not be a bumper crop year, though it may still turn out okay.

Oh, this little devil portends crisp fall days.  Not ready yet.

Oh, this little devil portends crisp fall days. Not ready yet.

This entry was posted in Local Food and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to Neglected Chores: A Garden Update

  1. Sylvie G says:

    I would like to have some of that fresh basil πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  2. reocochran says:

    The flowers are,growing like gangbusters πŸ™‚ I like my son’s zucchini and pumpkins about the same size as yours are. Your leafy lettuce looks scrumptious and I also love your Black Eyed Susan’s. The flower border is amazingly pretty.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Actually it’s amazingly abundant and healthy looking considering the torrential downpours, the heat and, I assume, the humidity! Sweetpeas are my favourite of all the summer annuals. I love how if you keep picking, they keep flowering and you get at least one fresh, sweet bouquet every day….. I’m still tickled by the fact that in my memory, I can see the road your garden is on, the houses on the other side of the street and the fence line that was mostly bare and is now covered by the abundance that is your summer garden. So cool!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      I can’t help but think of Alys and her poor sweet peas!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for thinking of my garden, Lisa. And I agree with Pauline, that it is really nice having walked your garden in early spring. It gives me a full sense of what’s grown over time.

        I’ll have to do more research on sweet peas in California. They looked gorgeous till the first heat wave and then they were done. But you’ve had tremendous heat too and your crop is taking over. Ah well, no extra water here anyway so I’ll enjoy the spoils of your garden from here and celebrate your community efforts as well. It all looks terrific.

        Like

      • arlingwoman says:

        They don’t mind heat, but they do need water, which we’ve had plenty of!

        Like

      • Oh how you tease me so.

        Like

  4. I love seeing all your rudbeckia…up here in Maine we call them brown-eyed susans…go figure. I am definitely suffering from garden envy!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Rudbeckia–I had been trying to think of that name with no success. These create a giant bushy plant with small flowers. If you saw all the weeds in the garden, you might reconsider the envy!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. It is humidity that gets to me – more as I get older. Black/brown eyed Susan is interesting. Not heard brown before, but it is surely more accurate.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. KerryCan says:

    Such abundance! You’re going to be eating a lot of veg–and sharing a lot with other, too. I have black-eyed Susans that are trying to take over the universe. I love them and dig up clumps and plunk them down at random and then those take off, too!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Robin says:

    Your garden looks so lush and abundant. I think it must be enjoying the heat of summer as much as you are. πŸ™‚

    Our poor peppers have given up, I think. The tomatoes are not doing as well as expected, either. But we have an abundance of cukes and beans, and will have zukes soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Boomdeeadda says:

    It all looks perfectly glorious Lisa! Especially the Sweetpeas as they mount their coup. LOL, is the Washington speak for, “growing like mad”? I saw DC on the news here a few days ago, they were reporting about the extreme heat. That must be hard to sleep at night. Is there a water tap your public garden? Earlier in the spring, I spoke to a gal about renting a small spot behind a duplex she owned (she divides a plot into 6), but the big determent was there wasn’t going to be a water source. I had no desire to haul jugs or pails in my car. I bet the renters had a hard time there in June since it was really hot here then too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Ugh. Hauling water. No way. Luckily, we have several taps and hoses to reach everyone’s garden. As for sleeping at night, the major assist there is air conditioning. I haven’t had to run mine much as my upstairs neighbor is keeping his apt so cool my air doesn’t come on!! It’s kept my electric bills down!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Ha, your garden looks much better than mine!! Did not do much either with too much heat or too much rain ;0) Your flowers, veggies…all look great! xo Johanna

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I was curious about the effect so much rain might have had on your gardens, Lisa. I installed new landscaping in my front yard and I’ve lost a cypress tree, vinca, and a number of lariope due to excess moisture. I’ve also noticed burned leaves on some other plants and found your lack of nitrogen statement interesting. Hmmm, I wonder if that’s what’s going on with mine?

    As for the acorn squash? I’m an autumn girl and just love when we start getting signs of fall! Bring it on, I say πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      You might just google lack of nitrogen in soil; I made that comment because you see it in farm fields. You might get some confirming pictures. Easy way to remedy is to start sprinkling your used coffee grounds out there in the landscaping…

      Like

      • Oh, so strange that you should say that, Lisa! I was just in Colorado with my sister-in-law who made that recommendation to my mom (who has a lovely garden – unfortunately, I didn’t get her green thumb). So each morning, we would save our little Kcups (πŸ˜„) and spread the grounds in her flower beds. Of course, her beds are large and we didn’t drink THAT much coffee, but better than nothing. All my sister-in-law said was that it was a great fertilizer, but I didn’t know why. So thanks for clearing that up πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        It’s even better dug in or at least scratched around a little.

        Like

      • Now that might be asking just a bit too much of me πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Robbie says:

    Your garden is beautiful:-) I am having a very bad year with my squash. It is “jus” now starting to take off + I don’t know if I will have as good of a crop as I had last year. Your acorn looks amazing! I wish I had one that large;-)
    It always seems, for me some things do well one year and another does not ( long sigh)…but as I learn each year, I do get a bit better at working around the obstacles:-)

    Liked by 1 person

  12. inc says:

    Beautiful black-eyed susans! They didn’t turn out for me when I had planted the seeds. Will try again in the future.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s