The Garden Shines in Transition

We’re heading into the last few weeks of summer and it looks like it. It sounds like it too, at night with the singing crickets and during the day with the cicada choir. It’s the transition time, with fresh little watermelons still growing,

This is a variety called Moon and Stars

This is a variety called Moon and Stars

and acorn squash maturing on the vine

DSCN3663

at the same time the little summer squash are still coming on.

DSCN3662

Sarah was at the garden weeding already when I got there this morning. She had already watered, but the dry ground had soaked it up.

Here she's busy with the border for the small garden.

Here she’s busy with the border for the small garden.

After we weeded, Sarah planted three rows of beets for the fall and I planted one long row of carrots in the small garden.

We even had row markers left from the spring.

We even had row markers left from the spring.

My own garden definitely needed a little love, so I weeded, hoed, watered, mulched, planted 14 garlic cloves, watered again to try to combat the dryness and then had a look at my work.

DSCN3671

I had harvested tomatoes, squash and okra, the eggplants not being quite ready yet, so I bagged my produce, filled my coffee cup with water and cut some flowers for the house.

Zinnias and Tansy abound.

Zinnias and Tansy abound.

All that beauty and good food too. I didn’t have to buy vegetables, but I did indulge in some figs. Summer. Nothing like it.

Is there time for this blossom to become a watermelon?

Is there time for this blossom to become a watermelon?

This entry was posted in Community, Local Food and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

36 Responses to The Garden Shines in Transition

  1. Jean-Marcel says:

    Always a pleasure to get the garden tour. It all look so delicious!πŸ‘πŸ‘

    Like

  2. Ah, it does have that end of summer dry look Lisa. I am living with that blossomy, fresh green, dampish air of early spring πŸ™‚ I like it very much! The two gardens have been quite prolific this year haven’t they. Are you pleased with their output? I would be most interested to know what the sum total of your produce donation has been too – that is such a good thing you do with your team of volunteers. I hope you have a goodly Autumnal harvest too.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Always hard work on your Saturdays, with your friends but oh boy that graden looks wonderful! Have a great weekend! xo Johanna

    Like

  4. So much energy and love has been put into those patches of earth. Wow, Lisa. You guys must be proud as punch. The pictures of the wee fruit and veg are purely adorable–and inspiring.
    Today, I discovered a surprise in my garden. I have a compost heap I’ve neglected to turn and tend to during the last couple of months (been a little busy), and found it has grown a massive squash plant and has sprouted dozens of ready to eat squash. A bountiful bonus without any effort.
    I’m thanking my lucky stars for that sweet and undeserved treat.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. We’ll, I’m not putting my money on the blossom’s becoming a melon, but that little Moon ‘n’Stars will be delicious, and so precious it will taste extra fine. I used to garden before mobility problems made it impossible, so I know what constancy of hard work it is….but look at your beautiful results! You should be right proud.

    Like

  6. A fascinating contrast between yours and Pauline’s posts today. I enjoyed seeing all your produce in the sunshine.

    Like

  7. KerryCan says:

    If I sat on the ground like Sarah was sitting, I’d never get up again! Your produce looks fab–I love seeing the melons and squashes grow up. Did you grow corn at all? That’s my favorite summer cop, I think!

    Like

    • arlingwoman says:

      She often does that! I can sit that way on a carpet or gras, but my ankles would be screaming on the concrete. I’m largely a “squatter” in the garden. I grew corn once, because like you I just love it–but it takes LOTS of space and is a heavy feeder. Maybe that’s an idea for the large garden, though. The year I grew it, it all came on at once and I was on the phone offering fresh corn to grateful friends.

      Like

  8. jennypellett says:

    I’m a little envious and very impressed at your wonderful crop of veg. The hard work that goes into this should not be under estimated!

    Like

  9. Ah, such a lovely garden, Lisa, and what joy to be gardening with others. Community gardens here often have waiting lists. They’re quite popular. It all looks wonderful. I can’t imagine that your weeds have even a passing shot at growing with all that tending. They’re sneaky little things though, and will no doubt outlive us all.

    Like

  10. Robin says:

    I enjoyed the tour of the gardens. We have a mystery volunteer growing near the compost pile that I suspect is an acorn squash, but my husband insists is a watermelon. I think I’ll win the bet, but we’ll have to wait and see. It is dry here, too. Some rain would be wonderful.

    Like

  11. Boomdeeadda says:

    I’m guessing, what gardening and helping others does for your soul, isn’t something you’ll find in any supermarket and can’t be weighed at any scale. I just love that you’re so passionate about your garden Lisa! The energy you bring there makes everything look beautiful and bright, even if it’s struggles thru these dry spells. I buggy-fied your little watermelon photo too, it’s so cute. Looks like you’ll have great luck with that one. My boss at work brought me a great bag of little cucumbers, I’m planning on pickles. I love the crunch! Happy days to you dear girl xo K

    Like

  12. Mary Tang says:

    How I wish I can say I didn’t have to buy vegetables! I don’t have enough sun or space for them; alas, though I am grateful to be able to grow what I can. Best thing about blogging is to read about others’ successes, like yours.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s