The Cold Frame Returns, Along With The Jerusalem Artichokes

The Jerusalem artichokes are coming into their own. At least the blossoms are. Who knows what their little tubers are doing down in the ground? I’ll find out in Late October or early November when I harvest them again. Last year, they were very tasty.

These are about 8 feet high and full of blossom buds.

These are about 8 feet high and full of blossom buds.

I had a busy weekend with lots of errands. I changed the closets from summer to fall, turfed out a few pieces of clothing and some shoes, and felt much better prepared for the cooler weather we’ve been having. Another errand was to the shoe repair/tailor to have some slacks repaired. While there, I glimpsed my winter coat, all sewed up and done except for its button holes and buttons. It is quite lovely. Lina did not think the buttons from the old coat would work on this one, so I went off to G Street Fabrics, found it had closed for business, and detoured to JoAnn Fabrics and crafts, where I found some buttons that might work. I’ll take them in on Wednesday when I go to pick up the pants.

I am partial to the button on the lower left.

I am partial to the button on the lower left.

Today I stopped by the garden to see if anything needed harvesting.

I may wait for this to get red...

I may wait for this to get red…

There were some squash coming on,

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some of which were sampled by critters.

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There was a nice selection of greens, from chard,

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To kale,

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To beet greens.

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There were tomatoes and okra, but it’s slowing down.

I almost missed this pod!

I almost missed this pod!

I took the opportunity to install the cold frame where the bean enclosure had been. Some small lettuces might do well in there over the winter. We’ll see.

I just love the cold frame. It's like a superhero of the garden.

I just love the cold frame. It’s like a superhero of the garden.

Of course, I picked flowers for the house, including a few of the Jerusalem artichokes. More and more I’m scattering seeds as I pick, looking forward to next year’s color.

I got one large and two small vases from this jar of flowers. Onward to Monday!

I made three bouquets from this jar of flowers. Onward to Monday!

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39 Responses to The Cold Frame Returns, Along With The Jerusalem Artichokes

  1. I like the button on the lower left too – second choice the one above. Not the acorn button – not on that fabric! I do love your fresh picked flower posies – such a joy to wander around the garden and gather up from here and there. I have turned the heating off and put away the winter throw on my bed. I am determined that spring has come to stay. She herself is still undecided today – but it is definitely warmer. I have just planted sweet peas, pansies and trailing lobelia in pots and hanging baskets for my front entranceway. There is also a jasmine being trained up a climbing frame in a tiny gap between the door and the fence which I have always disliked, seen no use for and wanted gone. I’m hoping it will all settle in nicely this summer and be wondrous for next πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      Ah, Pauline! I’m so glad to have some confirmation of what works. I thought the leather button was a bit heavy, though it might work with the trim. There were some beautiful green buttons that were perfect, but alas, only three of them. So glad you have turned off the heat and are planting It sounds as though your garden will give much joy and beauty this year. It’s fun to think we’re enjoying the change of different seasons–me changing closets around for fall clothing and you planting jasmine–which is one of the loveliest smells in the world.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. reocochran says:

    I feel your garden is amazing. The bouquets with lovely and colorful zinnias made me smile!
    I enjoyed your busy errands moments, too. I look forward to seeing your coat and agree the buttons you chose look quite nice and unique. πŸ™‚

    Like

    • arlingwoman says:

      I love the zinnias, too. Will be treasuring them in the next couple weeks as they go to seed. Pauline and Cynthia have weighed in on the buttons, so I’m more confident in the choice of the gold colored one. We’ll see how they look!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Zinnias are such a sturdy and bright little flower….love the arrangement you have there. I never used a cold frame, here in New England….it probably would have been covered with snow! But I look forward to seeing how it works for you. And now for the buttons…I agree with Pauline that the acorn button seems a bit clunky for the fabric you’ve chosen, and would choose as a favorite the same one you chose. I am 5’6″ and pretty much fit into the average sizes, so I’ve never had the need or luxury of a tailor-made coat, but I just love the idea of it. I hope it will be a warm and happy coat that you will love so much, it too will achieve the distinction of “threadbare.”

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    • arlingwoman says:

      My neighbor in the garden planted zinnias lat year and they were so wonderful, I planted them in the Plot Against Hunger border and got some volunteer flowers in my own. They are so lovely and varied. I love the cold frame. It has been covered with snow here and the lettuces were all snug. Of course I cleaned it off pretty fast. Mostly I use it to start seeds early. I was thinking tomatoes for the spring, after I had enjoyed baby lettuces all winter. Yes, the coat will be a luxurious pleasure. I got so used to the length of the LLBean coat and a coat I had before that (now we’re back to the 1980’s) I was not willing to go knee length, which is all I saw. I have to do to much walking to and fro to work in the cold. Since I wore the last to coats down to threadbare, I hope this one gets the same treatment–which means it will get relined several times. Thanks for confirming Pauline. I was hoping people would weigh in on the buttons. My favorite doesn’t have a match for the cuffs, but I think using the other style there will be alright!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Who needs a winter coat with buttons to keep warm when you can make Jerusalem artichoke soup? Quite my favourite soup! My favourite vegetable! My favourite flower!

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  5. Your cold frame looks as if it might hold together better than ours. πŸ™‚

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  6. Sylvie G says:

    I like the two buttons on the left. Beautiful veggies again πŸ™‚

    Like

  7. Robin says:

    I’m partial to that button, too. Your flower arrangement and your greens are gorgeous. I’ve been thinking about a cold frame so we can have fresh lettuce during the winter, and wonder if we can pull it off by putting a planter in the greenhouse. There’s no heat, but it stays pretty warm in there even throughout the winter.

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks, Robin! That button is the winner!

      Like

    • arlingwoman says:

      I think you could put a lettuce planter in the greenhouse. It likes cool temperatures and good light. Also, if you have a small raised bed, you could simply lay glass over it. My cold frame comes from Rebuild Warehouse, which you may or may not have in your area. It uses an actual window on a wood frame. Sorry for the short first comment; was using the iPad mini this morning and sent off a lot of comments early and full of typos!

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  8. Mary Tang says:

    Your choice of button is perfect πŸ™‚ The Jerusalem artichoke flowers are so cheerful; I used to have them and they’re no doubt still lurking in the ground waiting to burst forth. I like them raw when the skin just slips off easily.and the flesh is white. Older ones go into soup; yummy with garlic.

    Like

  9. Eliza Waters says:

    Lovely bouquet of bright flowers! You’re having a coat made? I’m impressed!

    Like

    • arlingwoman says:

      I had one from LLBean that I wore out and couldn’t find one long enough. I do so much walking in the cold, I decided to use the old one as a pattern and make another like it! Everything is short now and I wanted something mid calf. I’m also 5’8″ which complicates things somewhat.

      Liked by 2 people

      • L.L. Bean has always been my “go to” for good quality and sensible casual and outdoor wear, and their original retail store is not far from where I live. However, like most companies they have changed in the recent past to accommodate the more fashion- conscious and have a lot of their manufacturing done overseas. The timeless quality, workmanship and durability has slipped somewhat.

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      • arlingwoman says:

        That’s too bad. For the most part their clothes don’t fit me (a woman’s size 6 has a 28″ sleeve, which is 3/4 on me), but this coat was before a lot of sizing changes. I’m thinking of buying some more good boots for the winter muck though…

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      • Eliza Waters says:

        I prefer long, too. Land’s End has long down coats that are super warm, but it has to be really cold (20) to wear it.

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      • arlingwoman says:

        Yeah, I’m not into the down. They need very particular styling to look good and as you mentioned, require some pretty cold temps, which fortunately, we only get a couple weeks a year!

        Liked by 1 person

  10. KerryCan says:

    I love that herringbone fabric–all heathery and authentic-looking. It tustve been exciting to see the coat near completion. and you remind me that it’s time to do the great summer-to-winter-clothing-swap-out-and-purge. Our weather is changing dramatically between today and tomorrow!

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  11. Oh, I so have to swap out my clothes in my closet … just another thing to add to my “to-do” list πŸ™‚ Love Herringbone – how fun that you were able to get your beloved coat remade! And I think your spot on with your choice in button. I can’t believe G Street Fabric closed!

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  12. A busy week for you and the garden, Lisa. It’s heartwarming to see that the soil is still gifting so many delights in October. I can’t remember that being much of a possibility in the Midwest while I was young.
    And buttons? My favorite is the top left, but the lower left is alluring as well. I think it’s the coppery coloring.
    Can’t wait to see what comes about with those chokes. Delish!

    Like

    • arlingwoman says:

      Another blogger has given me a soup recipe, which I will try on the chokes. I hope I have enough to sautee as well! I don’t think the upper midwest has the possibility of goodies from the garden in October even now. Unless it’s the last of the winter squash. Or a greenhouse is involved. Thanks for coming by!!!

      Like

  13. I love that button on the bottom left. Did you end up going with that one? I look forward to seeing your coat once it’s ready to go.

    We do very little putting away of clothes in California. My son wears shorts and tshirts year round and doesn’t even own a coat. He has a sweatshirt for very cold days, but generally eschews that as well. I have one wool coat for very cold nights (by our standards, 50 degrees).

    I know, I know….California wimps. I do love the fall fashions though, and wish we had the opportunity to wear them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      You picked it! Man I would love living out there in disaster land if there was water…I’ll take a picture of the coat once the buttons are on. Buttonholes need to be made at this point…

      Like

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