Tagged: Blogger Interview

Last week, Bruce Goodman of Weave a Web tagged me for the Blogger Interview! Bruce writes a story a day, a poem a month and a piece of music not quite often enough. It has taken me all week to get to this. I am hoping to write another post tomorrow. We’ll see. In the meantime:

How did you get into blogging?

It was a perfectly awful time. I was laid off from a job. I knew I had some time on my hands and I liked the idea of writing. I have published articles, for instance, on LiDAR, and short stories as well as poems, but had given up on my novel and felt I would have some creative energy to spare. I had been writing press releases and web site articles on the Plot Against Hunger, but I thought I could do more and had been intrigued by blogging. So I started the blog, with its current topics and categories. Last year I added crafts, when I started sewing little felt things.

Writing about Plot Against Hunger and the library garden was one inspiration.

Writing about Plot Against Hunger and the library garden was one inspiration.

What advice would you give a blogger just starting out?

I would ask about intent. The bloggers you hear about are often quite nasty mendacious people feeding on negativity. The ones I have encountered are people I would love to be able to meet! Watch out you folks in Canada, UK, France and New Zealand! If I travel out of the country again I’ll be trying to see if you’re close to my itinerary (or adding you to it!). I met some fellow bloggers last spring and it was truly wonderful, so naturally, I’d like to meet more (and here in the States it’s easier). Anyway, the advice would be, do you want to become really well-known or do you want to have a group of wonderful folks to have exchanges with? The other thing is focus the blog. It’s best not to be all over the place. So while you can do like Bruce and write short stories, poems and music, that’s focused on the arts. Have a theme, so to speak, and stick to it. Given my inclinations, it has sometimes been hard not to hare off on some strange tangent. I’ve stifled myself. The other bit of advice would be to blog regularly. That can be whatever your schedule allows. I do once a week, but imagine I will do more once I am able to retire. Finally, before you start, have several blogs written already. This will help if life gets in the way of your schedule!

Don shows a potential gardener how to release ladybugs.

Don shows a potential gardener how to release ladybugs.

What would be your dream campaign?

I’m not sure what this means. An advertiser asking to show up on my pages? A way to get more readers? I am probably just totally ignorant and uncool, but that’s okay with me. Anyone who wants to fill me in on what this means, I’ll be happy to learn about it.

One of the ladybugs in question.

One of the ladybugs in question.

Do you have a plan for your blog?

I plan to enjoy it!! When I started, it was about Plot Against Hunger, gardens, gardening, and a traffic and transport category (if you lived in the DC metro area, you would understand that, but I haven’t written much about it). I’ve since added crafts and once I retire in a few years, I may add fiction, essays, or poetry. It’s something I’m thinking about. Right now, though, it ticks along, even though an old friend mentioned too many pictures of root vegetables. Hmmm. Everybody doesn’t find those interesting???

Turnips! Winter radishes! What could be more exciting?

Turnips! Winter radishes! What could be more exciting?

What do you think about rankings?

Golly, no clue. Are the blogs ranked???? I love my stats page though. It shows countries of visitors, their numbers, views, and other cool things. Several of my posts have had continual hits over four years and others help me trace the arrival of spring across the globe because they are practical advice about container gardening, straw bale gardening, or building a trellis from twigs or bamboo and other such things.

DSCN2116

I realize I am supposed to tag some other people with this, but I am very sloppy with awards, so I may tag people later or not at all. Up next is possibly Ramblings on Readings, inspired by the Contented Crafter. We’ll see what the garden holds on the morrow!

Rower moving south from Key Bridge.

Rower moving south from Key Bridge.

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51 Responses to Tagged: Blogger Interview

  1. Sylvie G says:

    Congratulations arlingwords ! I do love root vegetables photographs, by the way 🙂

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  2. I’m not a big fan of this thing that bloggers do when they give out ‘awards’ for your blog and you get to answer [often quite fatuous] questions and then nominate 15 more blogs…… It’s fun once and then it’s not fun any more………… But I do like this ‘Blogger Interview’ thing – if the questions were a little more relevant it could be excellent – It’s lovely to hear a bit more about someone you know a little bit about. Usually it’s just a part of us that is revealed in our blog – having to do with ‘the theme’ etc. More is revealed when conversations strike up and become on-going over time and posts and are maybe spread about in bits and pieces all over the globe and only the two involved can really understand what’s going on…………… But I digress – I enjoyed reading a bit more about you and your history with blogging. I’d love to meet up with more bloggers too – it’s such a great community. I’ll probably continue with the ones in this country for now though. And I’m looking forward to your next post – I got so many titles and recommendations from this one my reading list might be full for the coming year 🙂

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    • arlingwoman says:

      I think we have quite a reading community, even though some claim not to be reading now. I’m also excited about rambling on about books! The interview thing is interesting, but because many people are unhappy about awards or don’t accept them, I do hesitate to pay it forward and am fairly loosey goosey about it (wrote the blog listening to Keith Richards’ latest album, so just glad it seems to make sense). Back to the blogging, I do hope to meet up with more people face to face. It was such a treat this spring. US and Canada are probably on. Farther afield will be a bit more long-range planning. Thanks for stopping by. BTW I put Mom’s dangler into it’s Christmas bag! If I kept it out enjoying its rainbow and light show, I imagine it might be dusty when she got it!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I agree with you both on the award thing. I did it twice at the beginning, and it seemed fun at the time but then it’s more of the same. I like your interview, Lisa. I didn’t know you had written a novel, nor that you wrote technical articles (and now I know what LiDar is, assuming I spelled that right.

    Lisa, will you plant a winter garden?

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      I planted some lettuces in the cold frame and some shallots and onions in rows outside. The garlic will winter over for the June harvest and I have parsley and some blue Russian kale in the garden from summer as well as chard. I’ll see how long it lasts and it will be a trick getting closing the lid of the cold frame right, what with temperatures varying wildly! Re articles and novel, I’ve made my living writing off and on, though the novel is finished but not sold. It takes a certain amount of energy and dedication to do the research, send out queries and wait, then repeat after rejection! I may have it again in a few years, but not now. If you want to read it, I can email, though!

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      • I forget hold cold it gets there. It would be hard to stay engaged in a frigid garden during the coldest months.

        How cool that you made your living writing. It was something I always dreamed of doing when I was younger. I used to send out queries and short pieces, but never had any luck. My one published piece paid $50 and they asked for a picture. It cost more than I made.

        I understand the tedium of submitting queries, not to mention the regular rejection that seems to be a part of it, no matter how brilliant the writer.

        I would love to read it! I think you have my email address.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I’ve only made my living writing when I was doing articles. The fiction/poetry stuff never paid for me but I still enjoy doing it when the muse hits. Wow, thanks for taking me up on the offer to send it. I’d love feedback. Will drop it in the email! And if it turns out to be one of those books you can’t read after the first 50 pages, just let me know! That’s good feedback too!

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      • A teeny tiny fraction of writers actually make it with fiction. Poetry is even more dismal. You have to do it because you love it.

        I read once that 95% of all published books are non-fiction. Of the 5% that are fiction, many are name writers that get published again and again. It’s a tough market.

        I promise feedback either way. Thanks for sending it. As my head clears, I’ll have more and more time to read as I recuperate. Thanks for sending it!

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      • arlingwoman says:

        Thanks for taking it on. I like the idea of you recuperating with my strong-minded narrator. I keep thinking of you needing that photograph and having to spend your earnings on it. What had you published? Fiction or non?

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      • 🙂 Thanks, Lisa.

        I submitted a short to The Woman Engineer about a runner friend who published her resume on the back of a running t-shirt right after graduating. They loved the story, offered me fifty bucks, then asked for photographs in black and white. This was pre-digital, so I had to buy the more expensive black and white film, have it developed and then send it off. Further, they took nine months to send me my fifty dollars. I was so excited to have something published, but clearly that was no way to make a living.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        There are soooo many stories like yours about getting paid for writing!

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      • Really? Goodness what a sad state of affairs.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Great photos and I liked reading more of the background of your blog. I am just as ignarant when it comes to ‘campaing and ranking’ but share your love for the friends we make in th blogosphere and the kindred spritits to share our thoughts, hobbies or artistic aspirations. I must say, I rarely meet negative bloggers though I consequently blocked those from the start of my blog. It sems to work;o) Have a great weekend, Johanna

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  5. I join with the others in that I am not a fan of awards and such. I think they function for some as a way of creating a larger pool of followers, and that must surely be the point….since one doesn’t have to do anything really to merit an award in any achievement sense. This Interview Tag is a bit different, I guess, though I still feel one can get to know other bloggers better over time, by their posts and comments…and that’s how friends—not simply followers—are cultivated. I did like, here, reading of your inclination to write essays and poetry; I didn’t actually know that, though I suspected as much. I hope you do. Meanwhile, I enjoy your gardening posts and getting to know more about a part of my own country that has been, up to now, only an area where I’ve visited monuments years ago, and usually only hear about as “the beltway” from TV reporters with frowns and raised eyebrows. 🙂 Thank you for that, Lisa!

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  6. arlingwoman says:

    Oh, those people talking about the Beltway!!! They’re one of the reasons I started the blog. They blame a really nice place for our problems instead of the horrible people who come here and behave badly.

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  7. Enjoyed reading this Lisa, and love pictures of root vegetables. 🙂

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  8. Thank you for the insights, Lisa. I can recommend retirement 🙂

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  9. Mary Tang says:

    Thanks for sharing. Maybe you can post it as a page. I think I offended someone by refusing an award early in my blogging experience – not that I’ve been around that long (eight months). 🙂 What’s wrong with pictures of root vegetables? I am waiting for someone to tell me to stop posting about Sydney Harbour (I’m just about to post some; haha); I couldn’t care less. No one has to look at them. I take your point about having a focus but I’m afraid my blog IS all over the place; can’t help it – that’ s the way I am. 🙂

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  10. You can never have too many pictures of root vegetables!
    I’ve not idea what a ‘campaign’ is either… perhaps some more relevant questions would be a good idea and then you could invite people to answer or not as they wished.

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  11. Thanks for the mention, Lisa. And the interview was more than interesting! It does help to bulk out a blogger – and I don’t mean that in a dietary way! I didn’t know you have initially been laid off a job. Join the club! As for root vegetables – Jerusalem artichokes rock!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. With your wonderful way with words, I’m not at all surprised to learn of your writing “background” or that you’ve written a novel! I’m sure you’ve heard the stories of countless rejections endured by now-famous authors 🙂 Do you care to share what your novel is about?

    As for root vegetables, I confess I am not a gardener, and my eating habits are atrocious, but I am enjoying experiencing your joy as you recount time spent in your garden!

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  13. Eliza Waters says:

    Congrats on being tagged. I see we’re pretty much on the same page with our blogging. It must be fun and creative. And meeting folks from all over is delightful.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. starkwe says:

    Hah! I usually hate these awards, but I really enjoyed reading yours. Seeing who is reading me and where they come from is my favorite part of my stats. It’s so much fun to see that someone in Australia or Pakistan is reading what I say!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. jennypellett says:

    I don’t do those awards things either, they are meaningless! But an interview is fine, and a good way to get to know different bloggers. Most of us probably started blogging to engage with like minded folk, which I have, time and time over. It’s brilliant. Occasionally you come across people who aren’t all they seem, but that’s life and at least in the blogosphere it’s easy to avoid them.
    I like that you’ve increased your blog’s purpose as you’ve gone along.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. KerryCan says:

    This was fun to read! I think your advice to new bloggers is excellent–I wish I’d looked for more advice before I started. I also like to see you talking about blogging in years to come. It seems like so many of my favorites are petering out or stopping altogether. I miss them and am glad to know you plan to stick around!

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    • arlingwoman says:

      I sure hope to. It’s a nice creative outlet and provides bright windows into other people’s creativity as well. Hey, I sent you another chocolate order, speaking of crafts and creativity!!! Very excited.

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  17. Robin says:

    I enjoy your pictures of root vegetables. I can’t think of too many things more exciting than pulling up something out of the ground that you grew yourself and you can eat it! But I’m weird that way. Great advice to new bloggers. Focus is something I have difficulty with, or did until it became about my walks. Even so, I go off on tangents every now and then. I look forward to reading your essays, poetry, and fiction when you get time for it. 🙂

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