Thanksgiving: Tucking the Garden in for Winter

There’s nothing about Thanksgiving I don’t like. It involves gratefulness and I am grateful for much: a secure childhood, loving parents, family relationships, good friends, a job I like, a cozy home, good health, a garden, and the joy and wonder in creation retained into adulthood.

My maternal grandfather grew these strawberry popcorn ears. I use them as a fall decoration now.

My maternal grandfather grew these strawberry popcorn ears. I use them as a fall decoration now.

This year in particular I am grateful for a little extra time off–four days counting the holiday. I took Friday off, knowing the forecast was for a lovely day. While Jane, Sarah and I put the large Plot Against Hunger garden to bed last weekend, I still needed to finish my own garden clean up and the small garden needed some work as well. I spent the afternoon ordering my garden for the winter. I weeded and hoed and then I piled on compost. I gathered the stakes and tomato cages and secured them for winter. I watered the tiny lettuce seedlings in the cold frame.

The roses are still blooming and still have buds.

The roses are still blooming and still have buds.

The garlic plants are doing well and the parsley is flourishing in the cool. Lots of flower seedlings are up, boding well for the spring.

Perhaps the parsley is thriving because it's no longer shaded by the okra.

Perhaps the parsley is thriving because it’s no longer shaded by the okra.

Until it frosts heavily or we get snow or freezing rain, I will have the parsley, leaves from a beet I never harvested, chard, and kale. I also planted some onions and shallots in short rows, hoping they will mature in the spring. We’ll see. Potatoes and onions are terra incognita for me and once in a while I make a stab at figuring them out.

Garlic center; beet to the left; blue Russian kale to the right.

Garlic center; beet to the left; blue Russian kale to the right.

Many of the zinnias have been bitten by frost and I pulled some out, shaking the seeds over my outside border, which would be lovely if covered with zinnias.

Black-eyed susans are still blooming.

Black-eyed susans are still blooming.

I won’t be back to the garden except to close the cold frame completely when it stays under 50 degrees every day, grab some greens, and prune the roses and the trumpet vine. Ah, and collect fresh lettuce if it grows well.

DSCN3791

Maybe now I can focus on getting the kitchen remodelled…

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48 Responses to Thanksgiving: Tucking the Garden in for Winter

  1. I like your opening paragraph very much! Your gardens have done very well for you this year – those many bouquets of flowers and a good supply of fresh vegetables on a regular basis for you and all the food that has gone to those who cannot grow their own must have made a most satisfying result for all your labours. I also like the last sentence very much πŸ™‚

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Yes, it’s time. Then when I recover from that, the bathroom…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Looks like the garden is well tucked-in. Now you can look forward to daydreaming over the seed catalogues in the depths of winter. Is your Kitchen renovation to be a major make-over, or a basic freshening-up? That kind of project can be so disruptive of ordinary life….I wish you lots of luck with it!

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      • arlingwoman says:

        Oh, it’s major. My kitchen is 1970s apartment on the cheap. New floors, cabinets, configuration, not to mention appliances. Once I realized I wanted to do something with it, I kept holding off because of the disorder and disruption. But since I plan to live here in retirement, it would be best to fix it now. Some friends have offered to have me stay with them while it’s going on. I may have to apply to them again when it comes time for the bathroom!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Sounds fabulous! After owning several houses and been a DIY queen for many years (even painted the exterior of a small cape-style house in Hyde Park, MA) I enjoyed letting others do all that re-hab work. One of the many things I learned? It always takes longer and costs more than originally envisioned. πŸ™‚ Happy to hear you have friends who will take you in, for the duration. You go, girl!

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  2. Sylvie G says:

    Above all, you seem to be very talented at happiness. Thank you for the update about the garden πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mary Tang says:

    I envy your season of rest; no rest for us here (Sydney Australia)- 39ΒΊ C (102.2 F) Max this week and 43ΒΊC (109.4ΒΊF) last week.

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  4. Well done, Lisa. We haven’t finished yet

    Liked by 1 person

  5. KerryCan says:

    I feel the same way about Thanksgiving as a holiday–it seems the best holiday of all to me. We are SO far past gardening here that its odd to see your flowers still in bloom–enjoy them while you can!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I totally share your thoughts about Thanksgiving: so much to be thankful for! And indeed there is something very gratifying to put a garden to bed. grateful for the harvest, it deserves a good rest! Lovely post, Lisa, xo Johanna

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Lisa, you’ve strteched that garden all the way through November. That’s amazing. Those bright yellow flowers are so warm, too. I bet its wondeful to have them greet you.

    It’s wonderful to read of your joy and contenment as well as love of the holiday. I’m so happy for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Eliza Waters says:

    So many projects, so little time! It’s nice you still have fresh greens to carry away. I miss ours!

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  9. jennypellett says:

    Good luck with your kitchen refit. More disruption than you can imagine – but worth it! I love checking in to see the progress of your garden so I’m looking forward to the new shoots of spring with you.

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  10. badfish says:

    I love those corn ears!!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Learning about your garden timeline has been fascinating to this non-gardener gal. Are those Black-eyed Susans still blooming? Love them πŸ™‚ As for Thanksgiving, you summed up my feelings perfectly!

    Kitchen remodel – so exciting. Yes, disruptive, but wonderful in the end. I look forward to following the progress!

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  12. LB says:

    Here’s to Thanksgiving! My favorite holiday and as you said, there’s nothing but good about it.
    The remaining flowers are so pretty! It’s finally getting chilly down here in SW Virginia. I’m assuming for you all in NOVA, too?

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  13. Robin says:

    I like Thanksgiving, too. It’s one of those holidays in which the intention is so good that it sticks (mostly). Your garden looks so lovely and neat (unlike my wild jungle).

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  14. starkwe says:

    Oh, a kitchen remodel! I would love to help with that if I were up there.
    My mother and I were just talking about the wonderful garden my father always did in our backyard; she said he never could get onions to take off satisfactorily, and the potatoes never seemed to yield as much as he planted. I do remember those potatoes, though, always tiny little things that my mother would boil, then toss in butter and parsley. So good, even if there were never enough!

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