Can’t Have Fritelli? Try Fried Apple Pies

Yvonne of Hello World has mentioned a Venetian delicacy lately. More than once. They are called fritelle and are little fritters, which the Italians adorn with cream and other delicious things to help a body make it through the winter. They made me think of my paternal grandmother’s fried pies. At the farm market this weekend, I scored some dried apples, which were a component of Grandma’s pies, so this morning, I got going to make them.

I had gone to the farm market for some winter greens, but lo!

I had gone to the farm market for some winter greens, but lo!

The pies require a biscuit recipe and I don’t have Grandma’s. She just grabbed ingredients and tossed them on a board and mixed them up and shaped the biscuits by hand. You would have needed a baker’s mind and uninterrupted watching time to figure it out. My mother tried, but Grandma’s kitchen held a chattering mix of aunts, uncles and cousins most of the time, so she always knew she missed something.

The dough before rolling...

The dough before rolling…

Nonetheless, I have my go to biscuit recipe. It requires 2 cups of flour (1 whole wheat pastry and 1 cake for light and whole grain, or whatever combo you want, including plain old unbleached); 1/2 cup of fat (whether butter cut in with a pastry cutter, a liquid oil of your choice, or Grandma’s favorite: bacon drippings); 2/3 cup buttermilk (okay, you can use milk, but it is not the same. I’ve been known to add plain yogurt to milk in this case as a substitute); 2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/4 tsp Cream of Tartar. Mix dry ingredients, then add the liquid ones if using an oil, or cut in the butter until the mixture is crumbly, then add the buttermilk. Do not over work this dough. Mix it until you get a nice ball and no more. Overworked biscuit dough is tough.

Cut the circles out.

Cut the circles out.

Since I was not making biscuits, I halved the recipe and added a tablespoon of sugar to the dry ingredients. Once it was all mixed up, I rolled the dough out. Shoot for 3/8 of an inch. Cut little circles with a glass, coffee pot lid or other instrument that gives a 3 1/2 to 4 inch circle.

I pinched a little sugar and sprinkled it over the dough then added a bit of cinnamon.

I pinched a little sugar and sprinkled it over the dough then added a bit of cinnamon.

If you don’t like eating dried apple pieces, you can throw some in a sauce pan, add a little water and sugar, cinnamon, or other seasoning and heat until the pieces look like cooked apples. You can also use fresh apples, jam, or some other thing your heart or stomach desires. I just put the little chunks of dried apple in because I can eat them right out of the bag.

You, being sensible, would make a filling or use jam...

You, being sensible, would make a filling or use jam…

Once you have your filling added, you turn the circles over to make a half moon and pinch them a bit.

folded

At this point, get your frying pan out, get the bottom of it covered with oil and then some, heat it, and add the little pies.

1st side

I can’t tell you how long they need to cook. Just watch them, turn them and watch them some more. They will take less time once turned.

Getting closer...

Getting closer…

When they’re done, take them out and drain them on paper towels. You can sprinkle them with sugar, drizzle with honey, or add zabaglione if you have it on hand. They are good the next day, if you have any left and they are also good cold, unlike biscuits. If anyone is interested in using the recipe for biscuits, just press the dough to about 1/2 inch, cut with a small glass (2 inches), place on a baking sheet close together and bake at 450 for about 12 minutes.

I have four left. The first three were good...

I have four left. The first three were good…

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50 Responses to Can’t Have Fritelli? Try Fried Apple Pies

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    Oh, my! Wish I was there! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Mary Tang says:

    When I was in Istanbul I tried a lot of dried apple ‘pies’ and loved them all. I am sure yours is just as good. Bacon fat –yes!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Dear God in Heaven! I’m supposed to be off sugars and fried things – but this made me drool just a little…… I have that same plate 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      I love blue willow. And you can do it without the sugar–just reconstitute the apples with cinnamon and water and don’t add the tablespoon of sugar to the dough. Still have the fat, but…

      Liked by 1 person

      • I used to collect it [the blue willow] Oddly I was just talking last night about maybe getting a hydrator to dry fruits in – we live in an area rich in the soft fruits of summer and it would be great to have a dried supply. Apples of course would be included when they come round. Then who knows what might happen!

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I like the design, but also that the plates are a normal size. Modern plates are so huge. You can just dry fruits in your oven over a period of … time using the warm setting. Might or might not be expensive depending on electricity rates. But go for it. You could add it to your granola and other stuff. I just like to eat the dried apples.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I like what you said about the size of plates, above. I have a set from my grandmother, blue and white with scenes from early American History, and the dinner size is definitely smaller than the ones available today. Portion size has grown larger, too, in restaurants, so it’s now common to take a “doggie bag” home after a meal there. Does this correlate with the “obesity epidemic” in this country?

        Like

      • arlingwoman says:

        Portion control, lack of exercise, and processed food would be my culprits. You tend to fill the plate. If the plate’s smaller, there’s less food on it. I know, because these are not my only dinner plates…

        Liked by 1 person

    • That’s me too, Pauline. I read with one eye closed, mouth watering. I love a good apple pie, fritter, turn over. Yum. Looks good, Lisa.

      Biscuits will always remind me of my mom. She was a wiz in the kitchen as you are.

      Like

  4. reocochran says:

    Lisa, is that a Blue Willow plate? 🙂 I love fried cakes and also, adding sugar to the apples and biscuit batter is a good idea. Have you ever tried adding a bit of whole wheat flour, will this work plus add fiber and depth to the biscuit flavor? I haven’t but my youngest daughter nags me a bit to think of healthy alternatives. I like adding raisins to apple pie fried cakes, poor woman’s mince meat. Ha ha. Honey drizzled inside or out would be good, thanks for including a variety of ways to prepare. ♡

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Use whole wheat pastry flour. Arrowhead Mills makes a good one. The first time you mix it, use a mix of cake flour, which is light and the pastry flour. You get the whole grain but still have lightness. Then you can mix it in different ways. It doesn’t absorb oil in the same way regular whit flour does, so use slightly less with whole grain or it can seem oily.

      Like

  5. Oh wow, those look so delicious…I could really go for one right now! 🙂

    Like

  6. i”m afraid I might like anything fried in deep oil! Just kidding… your little apple thingies look like they’re dee-licious!

    Like

  7. Yvonne says:

    I’m mighty happy to have provoked you to get into your domain (the kitchen) to produce these sinful little critters. Yay for winter!

    Like

  8. Pingback: Fireplaces | Hello World

  9. Oh man that looks soooo good!! 😀 Might have to try a paleo version of this next weekend…

    Like

  10. KerryCan says:

    That’s a very flexible-sounding recipe! I like that it can be this or that, with that or this as a filling!

    Like

  11. judyrutrider says:

    I wonder if I used the “pastry” setting on my flour mill, if the whole wheat flour would be more palatable. I generally don’t care for whole wheat in anything but bread. It’s probably worth a try. I like the idea of omitting the sugar (we’ve tried to cut out all refined sugar too) and adding more cinnamon. Using fresh apples, I presume you would cook them first?

    Like

    • arlingwoman says:

      I never use WW flour unless it’s pastry flour, which for some reason doesn’t have the bitterness I taste in regular WW. Not sure if it’s the milling or the variety of wheat used. Try it and see! Yes, you’d need to cook the apples (except once I used very thin slices and it worked). You won’t need much filling.

      Like

  12. I suppose they’re all eaten now 😦 😦 So I won’t come over 😦 An apple a day keeps the doctor away, and I see no reason why a good dozen or so or your fried apple pies would not do the same job!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. mommermom says:

    These look quite delicious! The 1st of January and we’re all on a diet! haha😄

    Liked by 1 person

  14. LB says:

    Yum! These look so good, Lisa.
    And I have to say: I’d have loved to be a part of the chattering in your Grandmother’s kitchen.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Boomdeeadda says:

    Nom nom nom….looks yummy. I do loved dry apple too and probably wouldn’t have enough left to bake with unless I made them the same day. Fried dough is so tasty. Even plain with a little icing sugar. That’s what I might do. Fry the dough and eat the apples while I did it 😀 x K

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Boomdeeadda says:

    Hello Ms Lisa, we heard about your Famous Fry-pie from Boomdee,

    Liked by 1 person

  17. BunKaryudo says:

    Apples and cinnamon? Yay! That one of my favorite combinations.

    Like

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