The Heat Continues

Yesterday was another scorcher. I went to the garden in the early morning to harvest and see what needed to be done. I was able to harvest quite a few Juliet tomatoes from the small Plot Against Hunger garden. The large garden has some squash and cucumbers coming on that will probably need harvesting midweek. Joanne, another gardener who has gone on a trip, asked me to harvest her garden and I got some nice squash and tomatoes from it. Just the harvesting left me dripping in the heat.

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Tomatoes from Joanne’s plot.

I went back in the evening and weeded the small garden, worked the soil, which had cracked in the heat, and gave it a good watering. The small eggplants are doing well, but the large tomatoes need bird netting or we will never harvest any for AFAC. I’ll run by the hardware store today for that. ย I had a go at my own garden as well, where there are more winter squash coming on, but no summer squash, a problem for a few gardeners this year. My San Marzanos are snug under the bird netting and ripening away.

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I’m so glad to be getting these now.

The Cherokee Purples are also safe, though some bird netting opened up during the week and nearly a whole Brandywine tomato was consumed, probably by a marauding squirrel. I sealed up that hole.

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I won’t show what’s left of the Brandywine…

I’m getting fruits on all three eggplant varieties.

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The plants are all much smaller than I’ve had in the past, but still seem to be producing.

The arugula I planted last week has come up. It’s under the chicken wire cloche as I’m not sure whether its seedling form is tasty to rabbits.

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Just try to get at this, Peter!

I also picked flowers while I was there, taking advantage of Joanne’s offer of her sunflowers while she was away. Mostly I have zinnias in the mix, with a bit of Black-eyed Susan.

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No competition with Eliza Waters, here! Check out In a Vase on Monday and you’ll know what I mean.

And I have a nice little bouquet on the bedroom bookshelf as well. Next year I hope to have a nice wildflower border and a larger mix, though I have to say those zinnias are a reliable and varied bouquet over the summer months.

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It’s always nice to wake up to a little bouquet!

And have a look at that sunflower close up.

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57 Responses to The Heat Continues

  1. It’s good to know that some folks (like you, my friend) enjoy the heat as much as I loathe it. It proves the universal wisdom of opposites…some of us could be tomatoes, and some of us, snowflakes. But oh, how I love those zinnias!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Aren’t they something? I wish I had a little more to mix in with them at this point, but they still make a wonderful bouquet. Glad you enjoy virtually, but you could throw down some seed in the late spring and I bet you’d have your own crop. They don’t take much tending except for the pleasure of picking them!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I know….I used to grow quite a few varieties from 4″ to 40″ tall. They are heat and drought resistant and so brilliantly colored, in addition to being low-maintenance in that part of the summer when the gardener can appreciate a bit of a rest and still harvest bouquets….

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Quite a few people in the garden grow them as they attract the goldfinches. There are so many varieties of them that it’s quite astonishing–different colors and morphologies. When I was a teenager, one of the farmers in the area grew a whole field of them and it was quite something to see.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I so love to see sunflowers – there is something quite spectacular about them. I spied the felt coaster beneath your vase and remember sitting at that very table admiring your neat work quite some time ago now. I echo Cynthia’s thoughts about heat – though I also am not so very fond of bitter cold ………. give me somewhere nicely in between and I’ll be a happy bunny!

    Your garden is doing very well given the soil can crack in the heat of just one day!

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      It was so fun having you and Alys and Boomdee to take around DC. I do like that little felt hot pad. I am a person who loves heat. Fortunately, I am hating winter less and less, which I think is a good thing…I love sunflowers, too, and felt like a butcher as this one I cut had two other blossom buds on it. Ah, well, they were grown for the birds and cutting!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Boomdeeadda says:

        I’m glad we got to visit your bachelorette pad Lisa and your fab garden too. At your place, I felt like we were visiting a literate genius looking at your wall of books. But loved best your dining table and the story about it. Dining tables are like WordPress, they bring people together. Actually, when I first learned where you worked, I imagined you as some kind of undercover agent..hmmmmm. I think I’m still on the fence about that, LOL.

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      • arlingwoman says:

        I had some folks around that dining table last night and it was mighty fun. I heard about their trip to the Maritime Provinces (where it was in the 70s while we were having all that upper 90s stuff). Beautiful places. I need to go back there. Maybe next summer! Preferably during a heat wave here…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Boomdeeadda says:

        Bienvenue ! Some places in Canada do have similar weather to yours, but luckily we generally have more mild weather…mid to high 70’s works great for me !

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I would not mind that, but I could not face the winters. And I do like a good bone warming summer day…

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Mary Tang says:

    You know what; those colours at the heart of the Sunflower has inspired me to try and crochet one. I will post the result but please don’t hold your breath. I am an ideas person but not always good at putting them to practice ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  5. LB says:

    What is it about a sunflower that makes us all smile. I should plant some!
    While I’m not a huge fan of eggplant from an eating perspective (the texture), they are surely one of the prettiest vegetables.
    Glad to see that all of your “defensive gardening” efforts seem to be working ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Allison Harbick says:

    Gorgeous flowers Lisa! I can almost smell them all the way from Wisconsin ๐Ÿ˜Š At Vicki’s until Friday. Spent a few days up in Marinette at Bob’s family reunion. Xoxo

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  7. Eliza Waters says:

    I think you have more wildlife in your garden than I do! Your zinnias are lovely – definitely a happy thing to wake up to (and thanks for the vote of confidence for my Monday vases ๐Ÿ™‚ ).

    Like

  8. Sylvie G says:

    Those tomatoes look so fresh and juicy ! And the flowers, they almost look unreal !

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  9. jennypellett says:

    Wow! I can’t believe the size of those tomatoes! Do you feed your crops?

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  10. I like the flower arrangements, and hope the elements will soon be kinder

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  11. karen says:

    It all looks fabulous to me. Glad to have found you on here.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. KerryCan says:

    Boy, you work hard! I can see it’s paying off but the idea of all that moving around in the weather you’ve been having makes me want to wilt! Love the cut flowers–I have zinnias this year for the first time and will never go without again!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Lisa, it’s woman against critter and you’re winning. Way to go! How nice to have the chance to harvest from another garden, and I assume you do the same in your absence. I love the cooperative nature of your community garden.

    My tomatoes are producing nicely now, but one side are coming up bleached. I haven’t taken the time to research that, but I think it must be too hot on one side. My sunflowers are small this year, but equally lovely. They’re one of my favorite things to grow in the summer, along with pumpkins of course.

    I miss growing cosmos, and envy you your space and water to grow a nice cutting border. The ones I planted this year dried out or failed to thrive. Onward.

    I’m glad you’re managing the heat.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Hmm. Those tomatoes may have a fungal or bacterial infection, if I’m picturing the right thing. Joanne’s garden has cosmos, but it was getting dark when I was cutting, so I didn’t go there. There’s a cosmos variety called Sonata, that’s shorter and grows well in adverse conditions. Throw down some seed from a packet of those in the fall.

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      • Thanks for the tip. Lisa. I will. Come to think of it, I’ve had more success with seed than with starter plants. I’m just realizing that now.

        I’ll look up tomato troubles now while I’m thinking about it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I’ve had more success with tomato seeds put in the ground–or volunteers.

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      • I made the mistake of composting bland commercial tomatoes, and ended up with an all-volunteer flavorless crop last year. This year I pulled up all volunteers, to be sure that didn’t happen again and planted from starters. Every year it’s something new.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        We’re always learning! I had an orange cherry tomato volunteer this year and tasted its tomatoes today. Lovely, but with a yeasty sort of aftertaste–so maybe I should have pulled that one up!!

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      • Weird, eh? My favorite this year is a black cherry heirloom. They’re sweet and juicy, with a lovely dark shade of red. The Mr. Stripeys are good too in salad. I’ve given up on basil. It keeps bolting in the heat. We’ve had a few meals, but not as good as in the past. Next year I’m going to grow it on the front deck where it is easier to keep an eye on it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I’ve had a good year for the basil, but I do keep cutting it and making pesto or using it in sautes. I let my oregano get away from me, though. Ah well.

        Like

      • Oh man I love pesto. We usually use ours for Caprese salads, but I should look for a pesto recipe as well. My former boyfriends roommate introduced me to pesto pie. She would make it for me if she knew I was coming over.

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      • arlingwoman says:

        Oh my…pesto pie…. Well, you don’t really need a recipe, just a blender. Stuff about half the blender with leaves. Add the juice of a lemon and a couple garlic cloves. Toss in a handful of walnuts or pine nuts. Add between a quarter and half cup of olive oil and the same amount of romano or parmesan. Blend. Taste. Add salt, lemon juice or other stuff if necessary. Freeze what you won’t use in the next week, in small portions. That’s it.

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      • You make it sound so simple…as it is to a true cook such as yourself. I will jot this down and we will save it for next season. Yum! Thanks, Lisa.

        Liked by 1 person

      • It’s actually sunscald, as I suspected, since it is limited to one side of the tomatoes and only tomatoes on that side of the garden. Yup, it’s been hot and dry.

        http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/tomato-sunscald.htm

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      • arlingwoman says:

        Oooh, that’s nasty. We don’t have that kind of thing here!

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Robin says:

    Beautiful flowers. I especially love the sunflower. They are always so cheerful looking. I had to laugh at your remarks about Peter. I named the rabbit troubling my flower garden Nick since he’s always nicking my stuff.

    Stay cool. I hear it’s going to heat up some more this week.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Since yesterday, we have a little relief here with lower humidity and a nice breeze…we ate outside for the first time since weeks and this morning Charley and I were very happy after a long walk. Naughty squirrel to have eaten to tastiest of the tomatoes!! The flowers look wonderful, a vase of flowers bring such happiness right? xo Johanna

    Liked by 1 person

  16. It’s a great time – when the veggies are ready/getting ready for harvest. What a good idea to use the chicken-wire cloche to protect young greens- did you make it?

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Karen says:

    I guess I was lucky that I never had a problem with birds. It would be a shame if they got to your Cherokee Purplesโ€ฆone of my favorite tomatoes. Hope the weather cools off soon.

    Like

  18. Bun Karyudo says:

    I think you’re wise keeping the arugula under chicken wire. I’m not sure whether rabbits like it or not, but why take the chance. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Lavinia Ross says:

    It’s a wonderful time of year in the garden, and the flowers are beautiful!

    So far rabbits have not been a problem here. Our main worries are deer, gophers, and sometimes neighboring livestock.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Maria F. says:

    Beautiful, I love Zinnias

    Like

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