Catching Up

I can’t believe I haven’t written for more than a month. It isn’t as though the garden isn’t in full swing. I forgot the camera a number of times and then when I took it, I didn’t find time to write. So here is the update.

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It’s pretty lush in my garden right now. We’ve had a lovely amount of rain and things are growing wildly.

Jane’s fabulous Plot Against Hunger garden has already given about 15 pounds of produce to the food assistance center. And that’s poundage in lettuce and kale and greens! Okay, some carrots and radishes, too. More will be going tomorrow from the small garden–Tom Thumb lettuces and some carrots, as well as more spinach from the large garden.

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This garden is very productive. It’s given lots of lettuces, kale, and spinach and soon it will give beets and carrots. Later: squash and tomatoes.

So the season is in full swing. I had help today from Mike. He and his wife Gerda are neighbors in the garden and signed on to help in the Plots Against Hunger, which needed a weeding. Gerda will harvest early tomorrow so Mike can take the goods into AFAC.

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These Tom Thumb lettuces are the first thing to go to AFAC from the small Plot Against Hunger garden. Cheers!

My own garden is now fully planted. The spring crops, especially the greens, are coming faster than I can eat them, and all my salad and cooked greens recipes are starting to come back to me.

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I brought home kale, arugula, spinach, and beet greens from thinning. Salad days!

The flowers have been out–irises, columbine (aquilegea), now roses, and love in a mist (nigella).

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I love these! And they’re just getting started.

And mallow. It is such pretty stuff, but wildly invasive.

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I am the culprit who introduced this to the garden and now lots of people are having to pull it out!

Marcel, a gardener I hadn’t seen since last fall came today and when I wandered over to see him, he cut some of his peonies for me. I gave him a lettuce head from my garden. He said he was having a friend for dinner and would eat it tonight. Meanwhile, I have these lovely, amazing and fragrant flowers for as long as they last.

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There was no way to do these justice with the camera. Of course I had packed all my large vases, but the water glass was perfect.

I am in the midst of packing up my kitchen for the remodel. I have been quite apprehensive about it, but that’s because I like a calm, orderly home. Supposedly the whirlwind will hit on May 15th. Since I may not have internet access enough for blogging while the remodeling is going on, if I don’t write next weekend, I’ll probably be absent again until the end of the month. But don’t worry. I’ll most likely be gardening.

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35 Responses to Catching Up

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    Wow, your gardens are burgeoning! Everything looks great (love the nigella!) and what a haul for PAH.
    Where will you eat with no kitchen? Good luck with the renovation.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      I’m lucky to have snagged the apartment of some neighbors who really live overseas. So I’ll have a kitchen just down the sidewalk. I couldn’t bear to stay here in the mess, though I will be visiting every day…

      Like

  2. Lavinia Ross says:

    Your garden is well ahead of ours! It’s been a cool, wet spring here. I had kale that overwintered, and it is flowering already. Time to get another crop planted!

    Good luck with the kitchen remodeling!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. So good to hear from you, and what a prolific garden you have there! Well done. It’s so inspiring — so good that a garden can be used to help others.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I am very glad to hear the remodel is about to become a reality. Do I take it from comments you will be staying elsewhere throughout the process, but close enough to keep an eye on things? That sounds good to me. My daughter has spent all this year living in chaos as they finally decided to put their new bamboo flooring down throughout the lower level of their house and carpet the upstairs. Everything – EVERYTHING- had to be moved and as the skirtings also had to be removed and replaced some things had to be moved twice. She continued in her full time job, which includes working from home some days throughout the chaos – I don’t think it was at all easy, but she’s a trooper! Now it is almost finished she can see it was worth the effort.

    Your gardens all look lush and verdant and colourful and so much food! That is wonderful!! My walks are taken under nearly naked trees, scuffing through the gold and brown leaves wearing my new pink faux ‘bovver boot’ gumboots, scarf, hat and gloves. It’s definitely becoming cooler!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      I am lucky enough to have wangled my way into an apartment that is largely unoccupied. Larger than mine, upper floor, smaller kitchen, beautifully kept. I don’t think the kitchen there gets much use, but I will give it a workout! Oh, I have worries about this remodel and nearly made myself sick with anxiety yesterday and this morning, but I gave myself a talking to, went to the garden, and calmed down. Your poor daughter! I can’t imagine. As for fall, it’s so nice you’re got up for the weather! Pink boots, eh? I can’t wait for it to warm up here. Not boiling, mind you, but shorts, t-shirt, perfectly comfy weather. All in time, I imagine!

      Like

  5. Sylvie G says:

    Thank you for the update about the garden and the kitchen. You certainly have a busy life at the moment, so will wait patiently until the chaos and the gardening season end 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. KerryCan says:

    Your garden is amazing! SO lush and productive. And we haven’t even been able to bring plants outside yet–and may have a frost tonight. And, speaking of invasive, we have been digging out hops vines that we planted a few years ago–oh my! I thought they were so attractive until they got roots as big as my wrist and threatened to take over the universe! Good luck with the kitchen re-model–I don’t envy you that at all but look forward to hearing about it being done. Be sure to take before and after pix!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks, Kerry! I know it’s still cold up there. In fact, there are some frost warnings in outlying areas here. It’s been cool, but fortunately wet as well. Some plants seem like such a good idea (for me, other than the mallow, trumpet vine. Ugh.), then they spread wildly. I’m not looking forward to the remodel, but hope I like the results.

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  7. jennypellett says:

    I’ve just planted Mallow in my garden. It is pretty although mine is yet to flower. Good luck with the refit – does that mean microwave meals for a couple of weeks?!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Shakespeare says terrible things about Mallow and now I know why. But it IS pretty. I am going to be able to stay at another apartment, so will be able to keep cooking, thank goodness!

      Like

  8. Laurie Graves says:

    Lovely flowers! That’s great you have an apartment to say at while the remodeling is done. Look forward to hearing from you when all is calm and tidy.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Brenda says:

    Your garden looks so lush and amazing. We are still in the teeny, tiny, plant-emerging stage. I planted a mallow last year, but I’m not sure if it survived the winter. I didn’t know it was invasive, so perhaps I’m relieved. I really don’t like dealing with invasive plants. I never seem to win the battle. Take some deep breaths when you think of the remodel and envision how wonderful it will be when it’s done! Good luck and happy May.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks for the advice. A deep breath will be what I keep reminding myself of. The malls may not be as invasive in a less mild climate. They have unbelievable roots and seed prolifically. I suppose one way to control would be to cut the flowers , which are quite nice in bouquets.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Mary Tang says:

    A month is a good interval to show what a difference the change of seasons made. It’s never as dramatic here as we are green all year round and with climate change Sydney is near tropical at times. The daytime temperatures are still in the 20s C and it seems we’ve had our winter rain in summer. It’s topsy turfy. Do you harvest the mallow? I believe it is edible, at least in Shakespearean time 🙂 Good work for the hungry. I propagate plants to raise funds for cancer research; not enough space/sun for vegetables here. Good luck with the renovations.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks, Mary. Someone told me that the spent flower buds are ‘bread fruit’ and very tasty, but I did not know that! The kitchen rem=novations are the current source of anxiety in my life. Will be glad when they are over!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mary Tang says:

        I know your pain having once lived with an architect who never left the house alone and having worked in the business have seen the pain of many others. All I can say is, all that will pass.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        Ah, Mary, architects are notorious. I had a friend who wouldn’t stay with her father because the house was always torn up and her kids would get into trouble invariably.

        Like

      • Mary Tang says:

        That’s why I would rather let the paint peel and the house to crumble around me than let another tradesman into my place! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Lisa, I’ve never heard of mallow but it sure is pretty. I’ll bet its a great plant for people with poor soil or for trying to fill a large space that you can afford to turnover to a wild plant. Our Anemone can also be invasive, but it’s also easy enough to remove. I’m glad your Plot against Hunger is already turning out food for the community. Imagine if everyone did this? As for the remodel, I remember that stress well. Our boys were young too (4 and 7). We lived in the house most of the time, eventually narrowing our space to two rooms. The house was filthy most of the time, no matter what I did. The last six weeks the four of us moved into a residential hotel so they could scrape and remove the popcorn ceiling and then lay and finish the bamboo floors. All told, it was about ten months. It was stressful and expensive and maddening and exhausting, but we are thrilled with our new and improved home (it’s been 12 years so not so new anymore) and I’m confident you will be too. You’re lucky to have a place to stay close by and fortunate, too, that it will only involve the one room. For someone like yourself that enjoys cooking so much, it will be a real treat to move back in with all the latest and greatest, in addition to a better layout and more storage.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Even Shakespeare says terrible things about mallow. It IS a pretty plant and the blossoms are nice and last well in cut flowers. It seeds prolifically, though and has an enormous long root. I bet it would be all right where you are, since the sweet peas haven’t taken over. Thanks for the reassurance on the remodeling. I do think I’ve got a good deal being able to stay nearby. I hope the next few weeks fly and then I have anew kitchen. Whew.

      Like

  12. LB says:

    Hello Lisa! I, too, have been absent from WP, and I thought I would visit people before I try to post. The rain has really been such a boon for gardens, hasn’t it? Everything looks wonderful!
    I echo Alys: be sure to take before and after photos of the kitchen. I’ll send calming thoughts as you live through the remodel.

    Like

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