At Summer’s Height, Fall Planting

It’s getting to be the time to plant second crops, depending on where you are. Fall planting means planting to eat in the fall (or winter), and a few things can start going in now. This morning I had arranged to meet Jane at the big Plot Against Hunger garden to tidy up the borders and shake out seeds from flowers that are done–poppies, larkspur, love-in-a-mist.

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These are the seed pods from the love-in-a-mist. Eventually they go a golden color and scatter seeds far and wide.

I was late and forgot my camera, so all the shots are post garden. Mike, who has kept our ollas in the large garden filled, came around 10:00 am and helped us finish up in the large garden. Jane had to run to get to the farm market to drop off a boatload of produce, including some spuds she’d grown in her garden.

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Jane is fabulous. Not only did she dig these potatoes, but she scrubbed them clean for AFAC clients!

There were also tomatoes, squash, onions, and a lot of parsley as well as peppers. Yay, Jane!!!

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A feast for someone!

I also collected some tomatoes from the small Plot Against Hunger garden, a large pepper, and some peppers from my garden for delivery to another farm market tomorrow.

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Some of the small tomatoes…

Mike and I cleaned up the small plot garden and then moved on to our own gardens to work. I added bone meal to some squash in the large Plot garden that had blossom rot and planted some flower seeds for the fall in the gaps in our flower fence.

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Some of the tomatoes I picked a bit early to defeat the voles, as well as some onions curing and a green tomato that fell from the vine. Our bricks are being repointed, which is why the window is taped and there’s a contraption outside it…

In my own garden, I did some harvesting–a lovely zucchini, peppers, lots of cherry tomatoes and juliets, and a few beans. I held off on taking the chard. I’ll go back for that if I run out of veggies this week.

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Quite a few peppers! Not the best photo, but I was packaging them for tomorrow’s drop off.

I made an enclosure for peas and salad greens using screen from the former bean enclosure. It may be a little early to plant peas for fall, but only a couple weeks. I put those in along the sidewalk fence and added salad greens in front. Then I planted a long row of turnips both in my garden and in some open space in the small garden. I’m thinking I’ll try to plant some beets and carrots later. My carrots were legion this year! I’m still roasting them and enjoying not buying produce from the store.

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This week’s bouquet of zinnias, sweet pea, artemisia, carrot and mint…

My cucumbers are coming along, and the scallions I planted a while back are coming up. I’ll be looking forward to those, too! And of course, I cut flowers.Β It seems a bit odd to be thinking about fall flowers and crops at high summer, but if you want them, you need to plant! Next week I’ll get pictures of the actual garden instead of what I’ve taken out of it!

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The view from above. So glad I get to pick these!

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34 Responses to At Summer’s Height, Fall Planting

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    Wonderful crops of produce and I love your beautiful zinnias! Unfortunately, slugs have consumed most of my first and second sowing of zinnias. 😦 I don’t think I have time to try for a 3rd sowing, even if I did them in pots. So bummed!

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      Golly, slugs!!! We used to have more of them, but not for the past few years. I remember seeing a knot of their slime trails on the sidewalk and referring to it as a slugfest. But I haven’t had to deal with them in the garden, much–sorry about your zinnias. Yeesh. They must taste good. I’ve been sowing flowers for fall bloom today. Can’t wait for your Monday vase!

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  2. What a fabulous bounty – am I imagining it or are you harvesting way more than you did last summer? Or maybe you didn’t take so many photos last year ….. I love those early seed heads of love in a mist, aren’t they so beautiful. I haven’t had them in my garden since I left the original garden and home I made. Long time ago! I have to go look up voles. You keep mentioning them and I am ignorant about them. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Last year was the worst. garden. year. ever. So, yes, this one is more normal and we are harvesting. I didn’t get any food last year, what with rats and rabbits and … Anyway. Voles. They are field mice, larger than house mice, with pointy faces. They burrow and will eat things from beneath, the way they did my beets this year. So the way to stop them is to dig a barrier into the ground. I hope this one is deep enough. Will show a picture next week. Aren’t those seeds something? They look like an alien life form at that stage; less so when they are completely dry. I could send you seeds for your garden, unless it’s verboten (most likely).

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      • I looked them up – the voles. They look innocuous enough, but any wild life that has the temerity to eat a gardeners bounty without being invited risks their ire πŸ™‚ The seeds give off an enticing misty look I think – I always liked the froth of gauzy leaves around the flowers. Don’t send – customs blows up on sight any foreign plant life πŸ˜€ Fran in Tasmania once sent me some kefir grains when I was having trouble sourcing them here and they were confiscated and she was invited to pay something ridiculous – like $50 – to have them returned to her. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        Yes, there are certain places–NZ, AU, California, where one needs to be careful about agricultural products! A friend once got in trouble bringing me clotted cream from the UK before it was readily available here. A customs officer (before they got really nasty) apparently said rather wryly, “we have dairy products here, too,” to which Erich replied, “Sorry sir. Not like this.”

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      • Erich sounds rather British πŸ™‚

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      • arlingwoman says:

        Alas, American, but with a very proper former baron German father who defected to Geneva during the second World War…

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Sylvie G says:

    your flowers’ arrangement looks like a professional, in fact, I had the pleasure to receive from recently as a birthday present and they looked like yours ! Still living in vegetables sky rocketing prices country, to finish soon, I hope.

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks, Sylvie, and happy birthday! Having flowers to cut in the summer is a real pleasure. I’m not sure what the economics of the vegetable prices are in NZ. Last winter, a cauliflower was $9 in Canada and I baulk at $4 for one.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sylvie G says:

        Well, cauliflowers are definitely similar to the US (more or less). Avocados, expensive ($7), iceberg $5, and so on. Thanks for the birthday wishes, these days I try to forget it πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  4. jennypellett says:

    That seed pod picture is beautiful! You could make it into a cardπŸ˜‰
    I’m so impressed with your wonderful crops, Lisa. I’ve been much more hands on in the garden this year and realise just what a science it is. I’ve discovered that my plants are lacking phosphorus and therefore aren’t blooming as they should. I’m not sure if I’d ever have the courage to start a veggie plot😐

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks, Jennie. One of the things about a community garden is that there’s usually someone there who knows the answer or has a soil testing kit. Phosphorous, nitrogen and lime are all regular culprits, not to mention insects and critters…

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  5. Mary Tang says:

    What a harvest for you and for a good cause. I don’t cut flowers but I always enjoy the bouquets you create. Thanks for sharing.

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  6. Wonderful produce, Lisa; but it makes me relieved we don’t grow veg πŸ™‚

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  7. KerryCan says:

    Farmers and gardeners always seem to be thinking one season ahead–there’s so much work to be done, you have to! You’re really very good at this business of growing veggies . . . and me? I’m excited beyond all reason that I’m actually going to have a few raspberries!

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    • arlingwoman says:

      I’d like raspberries myself and will eventually figure out a way to work them into my space. Aren’t you in prime blueberry country up there? If I had a house, blueberries would be my foundation plantings. For raspberries, just eating them off the bush (like the birds) is often best, but nothing beats a bowl with a sprinkle of sugar and some cream…and talk about crazy pricey in the stores! Enjoy!!!

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  8. Brenda says:

    It looks as if you are having a bumper crop this year. What a relief after last year, I imagine. We are just starting to get our early peppers in here, no squash yet, but I’m buried in lettuce, peas, and chard. I love this time of year when everything is growing like mad and the pests and diseases still haven’t gained a foothold. It seems so early to be thinking of fall planting, but I’m starting to also. Pulling out spring lettuce and putting in fall beets! Happy gardening–and eating.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Lisa, your garden is producing an amazing bounty. I’m so happy for you. I love how well you plan your meals around your supply, too. It seems that nothing goes to waste. I’ve managed to eat maybe three raspberries and as many orange tomatoes this summer. It’s positively dreary. A few pumpkins are coming along, but all in all, not much happening. Your love-in-a-mist looks quite different from ours. It’s gorgeous. Our pods aren’t as oval as yours. I’ll have to get a photo up soon.

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    • arlingwoman says:

      It would be nice if yours was the real nigella that you can use for spice. They look like mine when blossoming, so it could be some adaptation as well…Sorry your garden isn’t coming along…

      Like

  10. Laurie Graves says:

    My, oh my, oh my! Such bounty! Those potatoes are especially impressive, and how nice to have flowers to feed the soul.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. What a fabulous harvest! I suddenly realised that WordPress wasn’t letting me know of your postings. I keep losing people! Anyway, it’s nice to be back – and with all this produce!!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Good looking crops there – ours, being badly planned and badly maintained, have been sparse this year.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Boomdeeadda says:

    That was quite the haul! I laughed at the tomatoe/onion line up on your window sill. It reminded me of this movie, “The Usual Suspects”. xK

    Liked by 1 person

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