Magical Flowering Quince

Last week, I saw these blossoms leaving work one day.

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I had noticed the buds earlier, but there’s that pink glow trees get in February when buds start to swell and I passed by hurrying in until one evening I saw them and got a whiff of the scent at the same time.  Oh my!

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I think they’re a few weeks early, but we haven’t actually had winter yet, just averagely coldish weather in the 40’s F.  Still, these things are magical, coming in midwinter, giving a lift of relief to the beautiful starkness.

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I’ve been meaning to go to Dumbarton Oaks to see the snowdrops, which I’m pretty sure are out, and to see whether the magical flowering quince is out there as well.

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But what a treat to see these!  And all week long, no extra visit required!

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There are two sets of these. This one has a more southern exposure and blossomed sooner. I photographed them so you could see how they were planted. In my usual way, when I saw the other ones in full bloom, I was so mesmerized I never stepped back for a big picture. Honestly, if there’s a place faeries live, it must be flowering quince.

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40 Responses to Magical Flowering Quince

  1. Lavinia Ross says:

    Those are beautiful trees, Lisa! Do you know what they are?

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Gorgeous – as is quince jelly!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. SueW says:

    I don’t believe we have these in the UK unless I’m going around with eyes closed! They are very lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Ah, I think you should keep your eyes peeled. Saki (HH Munro) wrote a story called The Quince Tree and I think there’s another one by an English author called The Flowering Quince and I can’t remember the author’s name–But one of the points of it its that the flowering quince doesn’t bear fruit, if I remember correctly.

      Liked by 2 people

      • SueW says:

        Just done a little research. The Quince does best in a warm climate but can be grown in the milder, dryer parts of England. Which explains why I don’t see them up here in the damp northern parts! That said, I don’t doubt for a moment that someone in a sheltered spot up here will have managed to grow one successfully it’s Sod’s Law!

        Liked by 2 people

  4. It does seem a bit early for them to be in full bloom…… but who will say ‘no’ to that! Beautiful ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Eliza Waters says:

    So pretty! This location is the perfect microclimate to make this happen. Pretty amazing to see these bloom in January! I must admit that even I am checking spots for early snowdrops because it has been so mild. Of course, our north-facing slope still has snow, but there are spots opening up around trees and low areas.

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      We do get snow drops in late January to early Feb, depending on the weather. I’m sure they’re out. The quince usually are early, but I’ve never seen them in January. They are sheltered in this spot, so that accounts for part of it. I hope you have some snowdrops to lighten the winter days.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Catwoods says:

    Stunning photos, Lisa! Good to see these during winter days!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. shoreacres says:

    I think you’ve just solved a mystery for me. Every spring I see occasional, wonderful trees with blooms just this color that neither I nor my friends have been able to identify. Of course I could have asked at our garden shop or such, but I just didn’t. Now, I’m sure “this” is “them.” Our redbuds, hawthorne, and Bradford pear are pretty easy, but these are stunning. If I had a yard, I’d plant one!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Sylvie Ge says:

    Beautiful flowers that feel like spring!

    Liked by 2 people

  9. I love the look of those deep red flowers in bloom! The weather everywhere is off. We had 60 degrees yesterday and 33 tonight. Plants are all confused. No real snow this year either. I may get time to work in the garden this week.Spring will be early this year. I’m glad you finally looked up and noticed the trees.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Spring elicits some amazing scents. I can almost “smell” your trees. Never mind that spring is still several weeks away, it’s good that you can enjoy them now. My hyacinth seem to come up earlier and earlier each year. They too smell lovely.

    I’m so glad you’ve had this view all week and that you remembered, too, to take some pictures.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Lovely, absolutely lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Zambian Lady says:

    Beautiful trees and they would definitely brighten one’s day.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. When our family lived only over the hill from my present location, we had to drive twenty minutes down the valley to church on Sundays, and in springtime the children would spend the journey tallying up the flowering quince bushes or trees that were scattered generouosly throughout the gardens and along the roadsides. I never see them in my current more suburban landscape, which makes me think of them as old fashioned. And I miss them. Your pictures are wonderful. Thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks for coming by! I think they ARE an old fashioned plant. They are around neighborhoods here where houses and landscapes are old, but they are also in new plantings–as the ones I photographed obviously are.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. A sight for sore eyes in winter! Not wanting to hasten climate change at all, but I envy all the gardeners who have an earlier spring than we do here in Ontario. Thanks for the glorious pix.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Gorgeous color! We haven’t had a real winter this year, either. So much is appearing early. I noticed my Clematis armandii is blooming today. I love seeing the blooms, but it does worry me. Enjoy the quinces!

    Like

  16. willedare says:

    After savoring your blog post, I am eager to find a quince tree in the Boston area so that I can experience the scent as well as the visual beauty. One snowdrop in our front yard and many crocus pushing green shoots out of the earth towards the sky… Thank you for this flowering quince education!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      You’ve got time to catch them, if they grow up there. Probably in some sheltered private garden. Here they were apparently popular years ago and are in yards as well. Thanks for stopping by!

      Like

  17. paolsoren says:

    The quince is amazing. Even the fruiting one have beautiful gentle white flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

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