February Blossoms

Supposedly Washington will escape snow this winter.  We’re having a cold snap with temps in the mid-30’s F.  Lots of things are in bloom.  The witch hazels are coming out.  This one, at Dumbarton Oaks, was magical in the afternoon sunlight.

IMG_0100

I was there with my niece.  We didn’t spend much time in the garden, but I wanted to check whether the flowering quince on the south lawn had blossomed.  They were still in bud.

IMG_0103

Super cool, with the beret and the faux leopard coat. The sweet-smelling Katsura in the back left.

We went to the museum inside the house, which is an amazing collection of works on landscape architecture, Byzantine art and pre-Columbian art. There are circular rooms by Philip Johnson that are echo chambers and whispering galleries when you’re close to the center.  It’s a fabulous place. Outside, snowdrops were out.

IMG_0107

I love these things and the way they spread–not to mention they come out just when winter is about to make me lose hope.

And there were crocuses and Siberian squill.  I don’t know what those yellow things are.

IMG_0106

And speaking of that, I’m taking advantage of the amazing knowledge in the community to ask what this thing is.  It’s in a courtyard where I work, and because it’s off the cafeteria, I hadn’t noticed it, because I take my lunch in almost all the time.

IMG_0093

But let me tell you, it caught my eye.

IMG_0094

And I haven’t got a clue.

IMG_0097

Help!  and have a great week.

IMG_0101

Now this, I know!

This entry was posted in Community, Local Pleasures, Other People's Gardens and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

52 Responses to February Blossoms

  1. So lovely! I want to visit there someday. The shrub is edgeworthia. It’s one of my favorite winter bloomers. Its SO fragrant! And I believe the little yellow flowers are winter aconites. Winter is my favorite gardening season:)

    Liked by 2 people

  2. The name is on the tip of my tongue – and if it’s what I’m thinking of it has a beautiful scent.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. SueW says:

    Beautiful. No idea of plant names!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I was thinking celandine for the yellow things but aconites is probably more accurate.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. You have already plants in blossom, and so many. I am not good with the names, and in English more difficult.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. willedare says:

    Having spent my childhood from 0-10 years old in the DC area (first in College Park, MD and then in Cleveland Park, DC near the National Cathedral) I love reading your blog and getting a taste of life in the DC area. I remember running around Dumbarton Oaks on special occasions as a child. Wonderful plants and landscaping. How terrific that you are already seeing snowdrops, witch hazel and other blooming plants! Thank you for a lovely post.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Lavinia Ross says:

    It looks beautiful there, Lisa, even in winter!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Eliza Waters says:

    I see the community answered your questions. So nice to see spring flowers and shrubs blooming. We’re two months away from that happening here, but I like the preview of coming attractions! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Aren’t blogging friends wonderful? Your question was answered. As for your niece…she looks smashing in her beret and faux leopard coat!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. shoreacres says:

    Your northern plants are mostly a mystery to me, and when we move into northern garden plants, things get even more difficult — although I can spot a tulip or forsythia! I’m glad you got your answers. You’ve reminded me that it is time to go on a snowdrop hunt. They certainly aren’t native here, but I did see exactly one, two years ago, on the grounds of a historic plantation. I suspect they were included in the garden at some point, and have endured. It would make a nice afternoon drive for these wet, gloomy days.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. tonytomeo says:

    Well, you already got the name of the Edgworthia. Perhaps the small yellow flowers could be identified too if you post a picture.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Ah, they are winter aconite! I’d have to scroll through the comments for the latin name. I don’t think I ever saw Edgeworthia blooming. I’ll be watching it to see what its foliage looks like.

      Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        It was something that our clientele wanted us to grow years ago, but we never did. It is not happy here. we grew a few items that clientele wanted, only to be stuck with a surplus of it in the end.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Don’t you just love this community! I’m glad you were able to identify the mystery plants. I’m happy to hear, too, that snowdrops are up to cheer you during the last days of winter. We’ve had an absurdly dry and warm February, perhaps record-breaking. It seems rude to look a gift horse in the mouth but we need that rain. Our poor planet. I’m glad you could spent some time with your niece. xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Thanks, Alys! It’s my go to for things I can’t identify. I hope you get the rain you need soon. It’s ben pretty warm here, too. I’m bracing for a long, wet, cold spring trailing into June–that’s been the pattern the last three years. Stay well. xo

      Like

      • I’m fascinated to read all the different and changing weather patterns we’re all experiencing, while at the same time realizing our planet is in trouble. I was stunned to wake up to the news of overnight tornadoes in Nashville. I didn’t even know that could happen. My friend’s son attends college there and spent the night with other students in the basements. How terrifying.

        Still no rain here as we say goodbye to Febraury, tradiionally one of our wetest months. It’s going to be a long summer.

        Like

      • arlingwoman says:

        We’ve had tornados here for the first time since I’ve lived here. Before, they always took the same path through Maryland. Not keen on having to watch for them. I remember them as a child.

        Like

      • Wow! The very idea is terrifying. Our biggest worry out here is a large earthquake or a forest fire, but nothing wind or rain related. Stay safe.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        Yeah. When you know the pattern, it’s easier, but when it changes and becomes unpredictable, it’s worrisome. I think the earthquakes are pretty terrifying too and that the tornadoes are equivalent, but they do come more often and more predictably than big earthquakes.

        Like

      • I will never forget the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and all the aftershocks. It’s been over thirty years but the memories remain fresh. Needless to say I have a prepared earthquake kit with first aid, flashlights, emergency blankets and the like along with pottable water. The bookshelves are built in, no tall furntiure and our waterheater is strapped to the house. We get no warning, so the planning for the inevitable is the best you can do.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I remember that one, too; my friend Kathy’s husband drove that bridge that collapsed most days. I was so relieved when I got in touch and all was well.

        Like

      • Wow. I’m glad he was ok.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Zambian Lady says:

    Thank you for taking us along on your walk. I have enjoyed Dumbarton Oaks countless times. However, I sincerely and wholeheartedly don’t like this ‘hot winter’. I am a creature of habit and want things to happen when they are supposed to. I hope we won’t have a snowstorm late in winter as punishment for the warmth we have had.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Sylvie Ge says:

    It looks like spring in your part of the world, I can smell it!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Klausbernd says:

    Our garden is always full of aconites at the end of the winter. They look beautiful combined with snowdrops. Well, we know these names but usually we have problems remembering the names of the plants or we don’t know the name.
    Wishing you a happy weekend
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Glad you got the answer. I’m just here in the snow envying your climate which allows winter blooms. Wishing you a great week, Lisa! p.s. If that is that you in the leopard coat — cool indeed!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. paolsoren says:

    Well, there are a couple of plants we don’t see down here. And I love the beret and scarf.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s