Almost Winter Gardening

Yesterday, I went to the garden to drop off some compost I’ll dig in after Christmas.  I wanted to pick some arugula and turnips.

These are some previous turnips, but yesterday I picked three similar ones…

I also wanted to check on the lettuces in the cold frame and the broccoli.  Both are doing well.

I’ll probably pick this in the new year, unless we have freezing rain.

While I was there having a look at some of the kale, I noticed a carrot that was ready and pulled it.  I’m thinking of a carrot and kale sauté sometime in the next couple days.

There’s something so cute about carrots. I wanted the arugula because I have beets and it makes a good salad.

Later this winter, I’ll sharpen some of the garden tools and oil them up so they’ll be ready for the spring onslaught.  In the meantime, I have some sewing projects and craft ideas to fill out the short down time between winter gardening and spring planting.

I made these cocktail napkins in November and gave them to the only person I know who will likely use them.

Holiday cheer to everyone and best wishes for the coming year!

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13 Responses to Almost Winter Gardening

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    How wonderful that you are able to harvest from your garden in December! My garden in covered in snow right now. 😉

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Ay ay ay, and likely more to come, eh? I went out as tomorrow evening we’re likely to be hit with freezing rain or sleet. The turnips will be okay, but I’ve likely had the last of the arugula if that happens. I do like to plant for fall in late August, but it’s hit or miss, depending on whether we get frozen precipitation and how soon.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Your winter garden looks great. A late fall garden by Maine standards. 😉 Love those little cocktail napkins. And happy holidays to you!

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  3. shoreacres says:

    As far as I know, I’ve never had a turnip — nor a parsnip, for that matter. The turnips certainly are attractive; what do you do with them?

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Oh, my. Everything from salads to gratins, to roasted, sautés, and mashed with butter. Like radishes, they vary from sweet to having a bite and the closest flavor to them is a radish. Texture is like jicama. I decided this year to refresh my recipes and found this: https://www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/g4640/turnip-recipes/ which has been nice so far–I’ve tried the gratin with sweet potatoes and the grated salad with carrot. I like them because I can plant them in late August and be harvesting in December and after. Keeps the grocery bill down!

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Oh, and I forgot that the greens are tasty, too, with garlic or ham or prosciutto or onion. I chop them and sauté longer than I would other greens as they are a little spiny and that needs to be cooked down…

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  4. Sylvie Ge says:

    Can you use the leaves of the turnips ? I have discovered recently that I can make a great pesto with radish leaves, provided I add a little nutritonal yeast to soften the taste a little. I hope you will show your latest sewing project. As for me, I use the sewing machine mainly to tweak what I’ve got from the charity shops, they are great in Nelson ! All the best for the festive season !

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Yes, turnip greens are similar to radish leaves, but larger and a bit tougher. The flavor is a little stronger. I sauté the turnip greens–good with garlic or bacon–it’s like getting two vegetables in one! I bet they would make a good pesto, but I tend to like bitter greens. As for sewing, I use my machine for alterations as well, but I have several projects in mind, one of which involves pillow covers and the other a small purse, the design of which I am still thinking on. All the best for the holidays!

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  5. Brenda says:

    Hope the broccoli made it through the recent weather! I love seeing your late-in-the-year harvest, but the camellia really melts my heart. I fell in love with them when we lived down South and cannot grow them here in Maine!

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    • arlingwoman says:

      I DID get the broccoli and a little arugula–I ran out as temps were plummeting. And yes, every year, I see a camellia blooming in late fall and marvel. I hope you’re warm and dry on this day after Christmas!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. It’s nice to see you blogging again, Lisa. I’m glad you’ve got some sewing projects lined up for the winter lull. Your cocktail napkins are gorgeous. Spring won’t be long now.

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