Now for Some Growth

I have been working in the garden since my last post, but I keep forgetting to take the camera.  Today I went to harvest lettuce, and remembered.

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Not only was there some nice lettuce, but quite a lot of kale, to which I added some chard. It will make a nice saute.

My visits to other blogs have not been very regular–for which I apologize.  I miss you all when I am not checking out your posts, but alas, sometimes I just don’t get over to the virtual front porch.

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Some marigolds and on the right, a little stonecrop.

My garden is completely planted now.  There is one surviving okra plant (now sheltered from the rabbit by chicken wire), eggplants, pepper plants, various kinds of zucchini, three kinds of tomatoes (San Marzano, Brandywine, and Celebrity), basil, parsley, cucumbers, lettuces, pole beans, and flowers.  There are also two kinds of kale and some chard (silver beet to those of you in the UK and NZ–thanks to Bruce for the correction).

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Love-in-a-mist, with some incursions of yarrow, and upper left you can glimpse the garlic and two cucumber plants

Flowers have been coming along nicely and I have had my first bouquet from the garden this week.

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I have been transplanting zinnias out to the sidewalk border and have inter-planted my eggplants with marigolds, hoping to ward off flea beetles.  I think the rabbits are eating some of the marigolds, though.  I planted more this week just to see whether the depredation will continue.  I would rather rabbits eat the marigolds than flea beetles eat the eggplant leaves!

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Basil, parsley and lettuce…I am hoping for some good pesto this summer.

The large outside garden is full of larkspur, which have started to bloom.  I also planted winter squash in there and those have come up.  The blackberries are coming along marvelously, loaded with berries and sprouting out branches. The blueberry bushes may require a better clearing or transplanting as there is too much vegetation around them.  I’ll think on that.

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The beans are thus far unmolested in their enclosure, which may be why the rabbit is nibbling marigolds and okra!

The asparagus I planted earlier has finally sprouted up, which makes me feel better.  So it may be that in a couple years, there will be a nice berry, asparagus and flower garden going out there.  Right now it’s a bit jungle-like, but once the larkspur go, it will thin a bit.

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I am ready for summer squash. Bring it on!

The garlic have shot out their scapes, so I will cut those soon and wait for the garlic to mature.  Garlic, basil and tomatoes are in my future, I hope.  Mother nature and my own diligence will help things along, I hope.

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Not one bouquet, but two this week!

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37 Responses to Now for Some Growth

  1. tonytomeo says:

    Is beetroot chard or actually beets (roots)?

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    • arlingwoman says:

      Well, I misunderstood the UK and NZ folks. It’s silver beet and beetroot is–just what you’d think–beets!

      Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        Oh, of course. I remember now. Silver beet is chard here. Now I am wondering what beet greens (as in the tops of beets) are. Perhaps we should not complicate things.
        I did not grow turnip greens until the mid 1990s, mainly because I thought of them as turnips, which I did not want to grow, but also because when I did grow turnips, I just took the tops off as turnip greens. They were not as good as those grown for greens, but they were good enough for me.

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      • arlingwoman says:

        It’s funny how these terms start–I have always eaten the greens on the turnips and the beets, but then either grocers decide they can sell them, or a study comes out and suddenly they are popular (remember the kale fad?) and people talk about them in different ways.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        Goodness! That kale fad is still going here!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Glad you’ve been busy in the garden! Chard (US) = Silver Beet (NZ)! Beetroot is the red root that stains the bench when you chop it up! You’re first bouquet is full of Spring and sunshine!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Silver beet! Well, thanks for straightening me out! I always thought beetroot was an odd name for chard–must have misunderstood the term. Yes, the bouquet is very spring-like, promising summer.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Your garden is looking green and healthy, Lisa. I’m glad you’re already harvesting for meals. That’s amazing. The flowers are lovely on your pretty table, and I recognize your felted table mat as well. Nice! I was wondering if you get any of the rain fallout from Alberto or are you too far inland? It’s hot here these past few days. I’ve been enjoying an unusually mild May, but today the heat is on. Enjoy the shortened week.

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  4. Eliza Waters says:

    Lovely bouquets, Lisa! Nice fairy roses and larkspur. I wish I could grow larkspur, but something (a rabbit?) eats it. It is always some critter loving the best things, isn’t it? 😉

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  5. Sylvie G says:

    You have great talent for flower arrangement . The two bouquets are beautiful ! I would not mind having some of your basil, but here, it is slow cooked bean season.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Yes, beans and cold crops and root veggies! I’m looking forward to the basil–and in fact all the vegetables. I hope they are eaten by me and not insects or animals!

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  6. KerryCan says:

    Pretty amazing, the way your hard work pays off!

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  7. Laurie Graves says:

    Beauty and deliciousness. A team that can’t be beat.

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  8. Robin says:

    Your bouquets are beautiful, and all of your vegetables look so good. Our greens (chard, kale, arugula, and rapini/broccoli rabe) bolted about a week ago. I’ll be picking the romaine lettuce today. I don’t know why I plant so much of it. I have to wonder that about the tomatoes, too. Turns out we planted 36 tomato plants (10 varieties). Maybe we thought we’d make up for last year (the tomatoes did not do well at all).

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    • arlingwoman says:

      My broccoli raab bolted last week too. I was so disappointed! As for the lettuce, it’s the only thing you get for a while, so I always plant a bit too much. My tomatoes were bad last year too, but I have hopes for this year!

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  9. Mary Tang says:

    You just concentrate on caring for the lovely vegetables and not worry about reading blogs 🙂 They will still be here when you are not so busy.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Maria says:

    I have an aunt in Illinois who just lost her flowers to rabbits. Does that enclosure you have for the beans, work? I think she had Daffodils.

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    • arlingwoman says:

      The bean enclosure is dug into the ground about 8 inches to keep voles from digging under it. So far it has worked to keep the rabbits from eating the new plants. Whether it keeps the voles out remains to be seen. They come in and just bit the stems off at the bottom. It worked a few years ago in another place until the screen started to get holes. For rabbits, you can use something like hardware cloth and just dig it in a little bit, so rabbits can’t get under it.

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  11. Brenda says:

    I love your comment that you “just don’t get over to the virtual front porch,” and have the same problem myself. Your garden looks happy, productive, and quite beautiful. Have fun in it!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Lisa, what a farmer you are! Everything looks so vigorous and that vase of flowers – gorgeous.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Boomdeeadda says:

    What a treat to have so many cut-able flowers to bring in. I enjoy Delp’s but find them a bit of work propping up on garden poles. I’m sticking to mostly lower growing perrenials in my new garden so it’s maintenance free (except for watering and deadbudding) Currently, the rose and peonies are in bloom here. But I can’t bring in peonies, too many ants, ugg! 😀

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