Early Summer Lushness

The garden is at that point where spring crops are mostly out, summer crops have gotten big and are beginning to bear, and everything looks lovely and lush.

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I just love this time with the seedlings coming up,

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Basil. I thought it wasn’t going to sprout.

the flowers blooming,

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squash plants thriving,

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beans climbing, and tomatoes looking happy

and producing fruit.

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We gave our first couple donations to different food pantries in the past week, mostly beets and carrots from the dedicated garden, which is doing well, thanks to help from my volunteer Holly, who weeds like a Champ and my neighboring gardener Mike, who keeps an eye on the water needs of all the plants.

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This garden has beets and carrots, summer and winter squashes, cucumbers, peppers, beans, blueberries, tomatoes, okra, and some stray turnips, as well as chard.

The work is pretty much under control, so some evenings after work, I’ve just been walking over there for the exercise, to check on things and to enjoy it.  Sometimes I see evil lagomorphs.

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It was eating grass, and far from my garden, so I left it unmolested.

Other times there’s a flock of song sparrows.  I tried to get pictures of them, but gave up and did a video instead.  Excuse me whistling under my breath on it; it was the chorus to Stan Rogers’ Tiny Fish for Japan, but unrecognizable as half the notes were in my head.  That was brought on by talk of smelt over lunch with friends on Saturday.  But back to the sparrows–They would perch on trellises and the fence and sing like crazy.  And they are cute.

It’s so lovely to see the trumpet vine blooming.

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And the rabbits did not eat my okra seedlings as they emerged this year.

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All in all, I can say so far, so good.

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This entry was posted in Community, Local Food, Local Pleasures and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

54 Responses to Early Summer Lushness

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    Everything looks wonderfully healthy and happy. We finally got the rain we desperately needed and the garden has responded amazingly. We’re almost caught up to you! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Oh that’s good! it’s summer and now there isn’t much time left for everything to grow, bear fruit, be canned, pickled and frozen (as well as cooked from fresh). It’s such a lovely time.

      Like

  2. Sylvie Ge says:

    Beautiful garden, the result of a lot of work, I am sure. I struggle too to capture birds. Some people will be so happy to enjoy all the veggies. Rabbits need to understand that human beings need to eat too.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Everything looks fantastic! Hope that rabbit stays away from your veggies.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hello Lisa! I got your email and it was followed by this post, so I came straight over. I am on the mend as last and able to take a walk again at last – it has been 7 weeks for heavens sake! More of that later. The little video ( complete with whistling) was lovely to see, especially as it gives a fuller idea of the lushness of the larger community garden. Drat the dreaded lagomorph though ruining your view! Now I’d off to dash off a quick update.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. tonytomeo says:

    Is that species of trumped vine native there? I saw it growing wild in Oklahoma, but did not bring any back.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Oh no. It’s invasive. I don’t know where it’s from, but it’s not here.

      Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        It certainly looked invasive where I saw it growing wild. It is not so invasive here. I do not know why; perhaps because it does not naturalize.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I think it likes a lot of rain regularly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        That makes sense. Even if it does not need too much water all at once, it must like at least sporadic water throughout the year to break up the dry season. That is a limiting factor here, where there is no rain between spring and autumn. Within irrigated landscapes, many of the related trumpet vines are quite voracious, but they can not grow in the wild.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        Yes, I think it’s a tropical plant, and while it’s hardy in drought, it goes nuts in a warm situation with regular rain, which is why it’s all over roadsides here now–our version of oleander, I guess.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        It is actually not tropical, but is not endemic to chaparral or desert climates either. It is deciduous, so does not mind frost. I see it only occasionally in landscape situations, but there is only a single specimen that I can remember locally. It is in full bloom now. (I just saw it yesterday, and commented that it was what we saw naturalized in Oklahoma. It looked very different while bare in winter there.)

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        Yes, I cut this one back pretty savagely in the winter; it’s just a whitish stem then. It blooms on new growth, so it doesn’t bother it. I’d love it if it didn’t shoot out little roots constantly. It’s a real spreader and it also seeds prolifically, so I pull the pods in the late summer…

        Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        It does not make many pods here, as if it relies on a very specific pollinator that does not live here. I doubt it is that specialized though. I have seen it self sow, but only rarely. Other trumpet vines do not self sow at all.

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        Mine are full of ants. It’s only safe to cut the flowers in evening when the ants have gone back to their nests. They do seem to spread effectively through their roots.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        A particular species of ant might be their primary pollinator, although the shape and color of the flowers suggest that they want to attract hummingbirds.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. cindy knoke says:

    Wonderful! Plants = life.

    Like

  7. Lush is the word! Wonderful! Bugs are a nuisance though. I mean BUGS Bunny!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. TanGental says:

    Rabbits! Oh heck I’d have kniptions! The pigeons are bad enough!. Looking good though

    Liked by 1 person

  9. A successful result of a lot of hard work. I liked the video. I had to look up lagomorph as I felt it would cover more than a rabbit, as indeed it does. Thanks for the new word.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. What a pretty garden, Lisa. It’s definitely lush! I love that you can just walk over after work—a real community garden. How many volunteers keep it looking so healthy?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. shoreacres says:

    I’d never heard the word ‘lagomorph.’ Living in a place where names like El Lago (Spanish for ‘the lake’) are so common, my first reading of the word called up “changed lake.” That certainly was wrong! I laughed to read that an earlier name was ‘Duplicidentata.’ From what you and other gardeners have written, there’s nothing more duplicitous than a rabbit with garden-noshing on its mind!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Isn’t it interesting how many words mean different things in different languages–burro being donkey or butter depending on Spanish or Italian. Since you looked is up, you already know Lagos is Hare. But duplicidentata likely has to do with their teeth, right? I think they grow all the time and the rabbits have to do their damage to keep them from getting out of control…Ack. What a thought!!!

      Like

  12. Lavinia Ross says:

    Everything looks beautiful, and has grown so much. I’m listening to Stan Roger’s song. I had not heard this one before. It’s beautiful and timely.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. You really have a wonderful garden! So generous to donate food.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Zambian Lady says:

    It’s good to see your garden thriving. I am glad to note that the rabbit was wise enough to stay far from your garden! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Brenda says:

    Do the rabbits come in under the fence or are there unfenced areas? We’ve been lucky so far that our fence has kept out rabbits, groundhogs, and deer, although we do get chipmunks and mice–who can do a surprising amount of damage. I love a good tour of a vegetable garden–even more fun than a perennial bed!

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      I’ve never fenced my garden; I just fence in crops I know they like. You can deter the chipmunks and mice/voles by using hardware cloth and digging it in about 8 inches (12 is best, but I’ve found 8 works) and then staking the fence. Just one bed like that can take all the crops they like–beans, beets, carrots…sweet stuff. The rest you can leave in the usual fence. The rabbits are actually at home in the garden…though something got in and killed a bunch of them last year. It was rabbit carnage, but I didn’t have any bodies to dispose of. I hope your garden is thriving! It always looks beautiful.

      Like

  16. “So far, so good” is the perfect mantra for a garden. It can change on a dime, but we always have hope. Your garden looks lush and green. It must be joyful spending time there, even with your bunny nemesis. It’s too hot to garden here lately, so I get in a short bit of work at dusk, before the mosquitos descend. I hope you are otherwise doing well and hanging in there. I realized today that our election is in less than four months…not that I’m counting or anything.

    Liked by 1 person

    • arlingwoman says:

      Oh, thanks for the laugh, Alys. Not that I’m counting… I think I will need to garden in the evenings from now until the heat breaks. It’s been pretty warm here and I realized today if I stayed out much longer I would be heading toward heat exhaustion. So I came home, did laundry and cleaned the house instead–in air conditioning! I’m okay, worried about this blasted pandemic not ending. I did find the perfect mask pattern for me, though and whipped up a couple. I now have quite a collection. Gave away chard, kale and mustard greens today to a food distribution center. Going to contribute again on Friday!! It’s about all I can do (other than wait for the offing election…). I hope you have a very dull fire season and that Covid falls below any countable levels in CA soon. Take care of yourself in the heat.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Maria says:

    Now I see what the trumpet vine looks like. Russelia rotundifolia is similar but the flower is smaller and the leaves are too. It’s more compact.

    Like

  18. It’s all looking good, despite the attention of the lagomorph. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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