The Garden Produces

Boy the summer crops are coming fast and plentiful.  I have more tomatoes than I’ve had for years–I think because I stopped trying to grow heirlooms.  We have so much fungal disease in our soils, that the only way to get a good crop is through hybrids.  The ones I have this year are tasty, so I can’t complain.  One year I made the mistake of buying Early Girls and I was so angry that I had allotted space in my garden to those horrible, perfectly round, hard, tasteless tomatoes they sell all winter in the store.  Even perfectly ripe from the vine, those things weren’t worth eating.

IMG_0360

These have been tasty.

But I have summer and winter squash,

IMG_0356

Okra in abundance,

IMG_0357

the hope of an eggplant or two by season’s end,

IMG_0354

and beans coming on, finally!  Yes!

IMG_0336

The longnecks we planted in the dedicated garden are coming on crazily and have weighed 6, 8, 8 and more than 9 pounds!  As several people have said–that squash is the size of a baby!

IMG_0348

I’ve got basil and I’ve planted more for fall.  I’ve also put in some other crops–more parsley, arugula and some kale.  I harvested all my carrots today, so that frees up some fall gardening space as well.  We’ll see how it goes.

IMG_0355

The peppers took a break for a while, but I have 5 large ones now and more blossoms.

Sorry to be so out of touch both writing and visiting people’s blogs.  It seems like there’s always just a bit too much to do.  But I’ll be catching up on the fly.  Have a good week!

IMG_0349

This entry was posted in Community, Local Food and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

48 Responses to The Garden Produces

  1. Bruce says:

    I always have trouble with tomato heirlooms. “Beef Steak” is the tomato I go for – I had a similar negative experience with Early Girl. Your produce is looking fabulous. Okra doesn’t seem to do well where I live – in fact I haven’t eaten any okra since 2006!! and I love it!

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      I’m a big fan of okra. It’s so yummy and fresh tasting. I like it with tomatoes and onions over rice, or fried with cornmeal, or split open, seasoned and tossed with olive oil and baked at high heat…Yeah those Early Girls, ugh. I like a good beefsteak, but I can’t grow them very well. My skills don’t run to tomatoes, I guess!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Eliza Waters says:

    Such abundance – and those squash are huge! Are they winter or summer squash?
    Recently, I saw okra grown as an ornamental. It is a pretty plant, both leaf and flower.
    Have a good week ahead, Lisa!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. shoreacres says:

    Your description of okra sounds so good. I’ve not eaten any in forever. I like it fried or pickled, but neither of those is particularly good for me, so I’ve about given it up. How do you do it with tomatos and onions? I like such things over rice. Maybe I’ll give that a try.

    We’re past tomatoes and such now, and are awash in fresh peas and beans, melons, peaches, and figs. My favorite Lady Cream peas are in now, and I’m freezing as many as I can for this winter, when a taste of fresh peas is especially nice.

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      For the okra over rice, start the onions in some oil and get them as close to carmelized as you can before you drop in the okra (just sliced the usual way). Season as you’d like. Drop the tomatoes in after the okra’s had a couple minutes to start and cook them down until what you’ve got is kind of creamy. Throw in a dash of balsamic, sherry, or other vinegar at the end if you think you’d like that. It’s a lovely complex dish… I should plant some late season peas rather than trying to grow the green ones. It’s too hot here for them and I like the others, too.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. tonytomeo says:

    It must stay warm at night there. I can grow neither okra nor bell peppers like that. I will continue to try okra. Even if I get only a few, it will be worth it. I just wish it were as reliable and productive as it is elsewhere.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Beautiful, beautiful vegetables! Ah, summer.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. That squash wriggles like a baby, too. I’m pleased you at least got some tasty tomatoes

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Lavinia Ross says:

    Wow! You have some beautiful produce there! For tomatoes, we grow OTV Bradywines, Amy’s Sugar Gens, and Sun Golds. The OTV Brandywine and Amy’s Sugar Gems we start from seed we get from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange in Mineral, Virginia. We have had good luck with their seed, even out here in the Pacific Northwest.

    https://www.southernexposure.com/

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      Oooh. I have used Southern Exposure, but have not tried OTV Brandywines. I’m growing some sun golds, though. Will try the Brandywines.–Just need something more resistant than the heirloom one. Good tip!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Lavinia Ross says:

        We love OTV Brandywines for eating and making sauce. The Amy’s Sugar Gems are the most versatile, we have found. Bigger than a cherry tomato, they are good slicers, tasty, and also make great pickled green tomatoes. They are also prolific.

        Liked by 2 people

  8. I see the evil bunnies are leaving your crops alone this year 😀 I’m glad you got some decent tomatoes – it would be so disappointing to have watched them come on and then realise they are tasteless. I always found tomatoes tricky to grow and have now given up. Well, to be honest, I’ve now given up on trying to grow any kind of foodstuff in my tiny patch! Thank heavens for the Farmer’s Market!

    Liked by 2 people

  9. SueW says:

    Wow… What a harvest!

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Wow, Lisa! Another plentiful harvest, and everything looking so good. You made me smile at the hope for an eggplant or two — we never seem to get more than that, even this year, when we planted Asian eggplants (thinking smaller= more, perhaps). I also love okra flowers – I think I’d grow them just for the flowers, though I enjoy okra too.
    Happy gardening!

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      I love those okra flowers, too. Can you grow it in Ontario? I bet it needs a greenhouse there. I haven’t been able to grow the Italian eggplants I like, but I do persist with it, as the small ones can’t be used for my antipasto slices I like to make. Good to hear from you. I hope things are well with you and your family.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Robin says:

    Wow! Such an abundant harvest. I’m so glad to hear your garden is growing well this year. That’s interesting about the tomatoes. We have not had much luck with heirlooms because of the fungi. We didn’t grow much of anything this year since we’re not at home, but will keep that in mind for next year’s garden. I do want to plant some lettuces and broccoli rabe, maybe some kind of kale, when we get back.

    Enjoy your lovely veggies! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Zambian Lady says:

    That’s not a garden you have – that’s a smallholding! Nice harvest.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Lisa, what a beautiful bounty! You’ve had great success in your garden this year. We too are finally having a successful tomato year, our first in the last three. They’re so amazingly sweet. It’s nice to find your post. It’s the first time I’ve logged on to WordPress for quite awhile. I hope you are doing well.

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      I was just talking to Pauline about you. Funny I ask someone in NZ about you in the US. I’ve been thinking of you, hoping the smoke isn’t too bad. Pauline said you and I are in about the same place re Covid. I’m getting tired of it, but sticking to the standards…I should just shoot you an email or a postcard.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Hi Lisa, The smoke is pretty bad and contiues unabated. They are getting a handle on some of the fires (about 20% containment), but they are planning to light backfires or controlled burns so we’ve been told to expect smoke.

        A few of our friends are waiting to hear the fate of their home. My friend Sue sold her home of 40 years just two months ago, and it burned in the fire. She’s devastated, relieved, and sad for the new owners. So much loss, Lisa.

        I hope you are hanging in there. xo

        Liked by 1 person

      • arlingwoman says:

        I’m fine as anyone can be about now. Longing for November and sad at the general state of things. I’m sorry about your friends and hope their home is spared. As for Sue, I can only imagine the variety of feelings. Hang in there and stay safe.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Sylvie Ge says:

    I’ve not had okra yet. What a great garden you have!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. They all look so healthy and delicious! Tomatoes are my favorite thing about summer. Good to see your garden and hear from you, Lisa.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Brenda says:

    I just love looking at your veggies! It was a fantastic year for okra here. I grow it with a plastic mulch on the soil and it does surprisingly well in Maine. It’s interesting that you have trouble with the heirloom tomatoes. Do you have other heirloom vegetables that are also susceptible to the soil fungi, or is it just tomatoes? Have you tried Rutgers tomatoes? Although technically heirlooms, they were the parents for many modern hybrids and are supposed to be pretty resistant to wilts. And, they are pretty tasty.

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      Oooh, it’s so good to know your okra worked out. It’s a particular fungal wilt that gets the tomatoes. I did grow Rutgers years ago and should try them again. I also grew Mortgage Lifter years ago. They are hard to get as plants, though, and I don’t have the space to start seeds inside. If you know of a garden catalog that sells them as plants, let me know. I did like the Rutgers, but I think I started them in my cold frame…

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Is that tricky photograph there or are those white gourds as big as a cooler? Or are they the same ones as photographed above with the little tomatoes? How do you cook that then? Am I asking too many questions, LOL!
    You certainly have a green thumb. I forget, do you have a water tap on site? I can’t imagine carrying water from home. Well Bon appetit ! ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    • arlingwoman says:

      Yes, those things are enormous. I had one that weighed 18 pounds, but most are in the 8-10 range. You just stab them with a knife a few times and toss them in an oven on your biggest pan. They’re basically butternuts but an old variety that gets big. I’m going to keep one. The rest are going to food banks. Yes, thank goodness we have water! Do you still have your garden?

      Liked by 2 people

  18. willedare says:

    I love seeing the fruits of your gardening labors as well as reading all the comments and suggestions from other plant-lovers. Hurrah for those of us who love okra! And hurrah for those extraordinary squashes!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s